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Is there a recycle bin in Linux?

Posted on 2011-03-09
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Last Modified: 2016-02-10
I was having some "space issues" on my server so I deleted a bunch of stuff, and it didn't seem to free up my available space?

I'm running FreeBSD.
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Question by:hrolsons
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by:jppinto
ID: 35085003
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by:ragnarok89
ID: 35085083
This is for the gnome trash, I'm not sure where KDEs trash is located... But put this somewhere in your users ~/.bashrc:

Code:

alias rm='mv --target-directory ~/.Trash'

Now, if rm a file or directory as that user, it should go to trash instead of permanent deletion.

--- Beware that you have to re-login first for this to take effect! ---
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by:torimar
ID: 35085157
Recycle bins will only be found in GUI enhanced Linux, and they only apply to files you deleted using the graphical interface in some way.
They do not apply to deletions via the 'rm' command on the CLI.

If you run a server, chances are it is CLI only, so you would have to check elsewhere for the space that is not freed.
Mabe you deleted links to files, not the files themselves?
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 35093862
Where do you have "space issues", and what did you delete?

Please keep in mind that "available space" is a filesystem property, so deleting files in one FS will only free up space in that FS and nowhere else.

Check with "df" for filesystems and space parameters!

Further, deleting a file which is held open by some process will not yield free space until the process holding the concerned file handle ends!

wmp
 
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mccracky earned 500 total points
ID: 35110620
Is the machine in question FreeBSD or Linux?

You can find the partitions usage with the command "df"
You can find file size through the use of the command "du"

I usually drill down to the larger files through the use of

du -ka --max-depth=2 | sort -n

which sorts the larger files/directories to the bottom of the list.
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