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Perl precision arithmetic, typcasting?

Posted on 2011-03-09
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Last Modified: 2013-12-25
Thinking out loud here... just need some assurance and explanation.

I ran across code like this today.

$number = 100.12;
$number = int($number*100);
print "$number\n";
$number = $number/100;
print "$number\n";

Yields:
10012
100.12

as expected....

The problem: 1200.12
Yields:
120011
1200.11

So I think the only issue is the int(). I removed it and so far results are as expected. I'm just surprised that I found this issue, the code has been in use for a long time. So I'm concerned that there was a good reason for it and I'm creating another unforeseen problem. Also, want to make sure there's just not a better way to do it.

The value should always be a whole dollar or dollar.cents value, and should be enforced as such. Then stored without the decimal.

So (I guess) my question is what would you do?

The objective is to store the number without the decimal in it. The code snip is just an adhoc example. I mean you could do it without even using math. I know Perl has issues with floating-point arithmetic precision.
 
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Question by:kindaprog
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by:Subrat (C++ windows/Linux)
ID: 35089897
What about using the string?
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Author Comment

by:kindaprog
ID: 35089938
Do you mean just checking if it has a decimal point?

Then if it does split on it and make sure the right side has two digits (add a zero if needed etc.) and cat the two parts back together... if it doesn't just tack on two zeros.
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Accepted Solution

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Tintin earned 500 total points
ID: 35090118
Perl doesn't have an issue with floating point.  It's common to all programming languages.

int EXPR
       int     Returns the integer portion of EXPR.  If EXPR is omitted, uses
               $_.  You should not use this function for rounding: one because
               it truncates towards 0, and two because machine representations
               of floating point numbers can sometimes produce
               counterintuitive results.  For example, "int(-6.725/0.025)"
               produces -268 rather than the correct -269; that's because it's
               really more like -268.99999999999994315658 instead.  Usually,
               the "sprintf", "printf", or the "POSIX::floor" and
               "POSIX::ceil" functions will serve you better than will int().
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Author Comment

by:kindaprog
ID: 35090442
Yes Sir. I was just realizing this fact. Same results in a c program...

Do you have a preference/recommendation??

I was just trying this and it seems to work consistently.

$number = sprintf("%.0f", $number)

Thank you.
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