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CNAMEs all the way?

Posted on 2011-03-10
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
So I'm not especially happy with my current webhost with whom we have scores of webservers with a managed hardware setup and no control over IP assignment.

Since I won't be able to take out a new supplier and reassign the IPs, I was wondering about the following scenario.

What if rather than pointing my domains to the 'A' records, I set up a bunch of domains e.g. 12-34-56-78.mydomain.com pointing at the infrastructure IPs and then CNAMEd all domains to the relevant IP?

That way I can migrate sites to a new supplier by lowering the TTL on 12-34-56-78.mydomain.com and repointing it to the new supplier.

Will this work? Will I hit problems?
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Question by:Borgs8472
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by:noci
ID: 35109911
That should work. In fact that's the way it should have been setup anyway.
As with every A records there should be a PTR record, and you can have only one PTR record for an address....

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Borgs8472 earned 0 total points
ID: 35117665
I've finished my research. Because you can't CNAME the @ record, cunning must be employed.

Given you're running a typically customer1.com, www.customer1.com setup with www.customer1.com being the primary. First off you create a customer1.yourhostingdomain.com address that points to the server where you want it.

Then you CNAME www.customer1.com to customer1.yourhostingdomain.com

Importantly, you must perform the 301 redirect from customer1.com www.customer1.com on a DNS server you control. In my case I've asked in my DNS provider (MelbourneIT) can support this.

If so, DNS setup becomes a little complex as you have to point the A record to your DNS provider (or some other hosting) and CNAME the www record, but after doing so you have full control of where you want to point the website, despite not being the DNS host.

Also, yourhostingdomain.com becomes a single DNS point of failure for your whole operation so it must be highly robust.
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by:Borgs8472
ID: 35154525
Solved own issue
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