Coldfusion using 650MB of memory on my linux box, with no traffic

Posted on 2011-03-10
Medium Priority
Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I have CF 9 standard running on my Red Hat box.  

I only have a few sites setup with basically no traffic at the moment, yet Coldfusion is using 650MB of memory.  Seems crazy high.  

Any ideas here?  
Question by:MFredin

Accepted Solution

witsCOMPUTING earned 500 total points
ID: 35105978
I think its not very crazy.. You might have installed additional ColdFusion services.. like ODBC Service, .Net Service etc. ColdFusion required JRE which itself is memory hungry.

Assisted Solution

tampatechtiger earned 500 total points
ID: 35109126
Do you have FusionReactor or SeeFusion installed as well?  Depending on how you have your CF Admin JVM settings configured, you may have allocated a lot more memory to your JVM than you want/need.  Even if you aren't "using" all of the allocated memory, CF "reserves" it for use.  In SeeFusion/FusionReactor (or if you had CF 9 Enterprise) you should be able to see the Used vs. Available memory and get a better picture of whether you are truly "using" that much memory of if it is just allocated to the CF JVM.

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