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Server 2003 64-bit Memory Usage

I have a 64-bit server 2003 Standard Ed R2 with 4 GB physical memory installed.

I'm looking into performance issues from a mysql database that is running roughly 1250 mb in memory. Task manager shows 2 GB available physical memory, and 3 GB page file usage.

The mysqld-nt.exe *32 process always starts with ~94% of the 1250 MB in VM and remains this way. Why is this memory not being allocated to physical memory rather than virtual?
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m3tech
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m3tech
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arunexpCommented:
it depends on the application architecture..some of the commonly used dlls might be loading in to the page file when sql startup..if they leave the phy memory free it could be well utilized for system
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LMiller7Commented:
You are misinterpreting the Task Manager display.
The column labeled "VM Size" is actually referring to the process's private bytes. This is memory allocated for the process's private use and could be paged to the pagefile at the memory managers discretion. The "VM Usage" could be either higher or lower than the "Mem Usage" column and this would not indicate a problem either way. There is no way to tell from Task Manager how much actually is paged out.

Task Manager has a long history of confused and misleading labels. This is just one example.

The graph labeled "PF Usage" in Task Manager is actually showing the commit charge, not actual pagefile usage. This is essentially the private bytes usage for the entire system. Same for the associated history graph. There is no way to tell actual pagefile usage from Task Manager.

This is another example of a confusing and misleading label.
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LMiller7Commented:
One of the challenges of understanding Task Manager is getting to know what the labels actually mean. Microsoft product documentation isn't going to help much. Labels are often inconsistent with standard industry usage, with other Microsoft utilities, and sometimes even within Task Manager itself. This has caused considerable confusion among both novices and advanced users.
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