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I have a high count on active connections is this normal

Posted on 2011-03-10
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Take a look atthe attached pic and tell me what you think.
this is a front end sql server that serves 50 or so people. the back end on this is a massive dl 380 g7 with 16 hard drives in a raid 10 and 32 gigs of ram and 2 6 core procs that are hyper threaded.
giving you a total of 24 cores.
However this server is a dell 2800 with 2 3.0 ghz 800 FSB CPU's and server 2003 r2 and 4 gigs of ram
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Question by:explorer648
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by:Adam Brown
ID: 35101716
I think you might have forgotten to attach the picture.
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by:explorer648
ID: 35102298
Yeah sorry about that here is the pic
prefmon.png
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Adam Brown earned 500 total points
ID: 35113157
That's actually not a very high number. As an example of what is showing on my home test server (the one only I use) I've attached a screenshot of my perfmon. Note that it shows 501,000 connections active. It should be noted that an "Active Connection" will initiate the second someone requests any resource on the server (DNS, SMB, Exchange connections, etc.). Connections can stay "active" for a very long time. An active connection includes anything in a wait state, a listening state, or an established state. You can view the active connections by running netstat from the command line to get a better idea of what types of connections you have open. http://www.windowsreference.com/free-utilities/how-to-view-active-tcp-and-udp-connections-in-windows-server-2008vistaxp2000/ also has a link to a useful utility that will let you view all connections on the computer. I can't find any information on exactly how long an "Active Connection" lasts in Windows, but given the number of connections open on my system and the fact that it's been online for about a month or so without reboot, they probably hang around until a reboot occurs.
Active-Connections.GIF
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