Dynamic and Static IPs on a home network

I have a normal DSL connection at home, with 3 PCs. I would like the PCs to have static IP addresses, but still be able to have wireless devices (phones, laptops etc) obtain a dynamic IP.

Can I do this by having my wireless router assign the IPs and then have a second router that the static IP PCs connect to?
I have attemped to attach an image showing what I think will work.
Both the routers are standard D-Link routers.  Network Diagram
SteveHoggAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Webinar] Streamline your web hosting managementRegister Today

x
 
Dave BaldwinConnect With a Mentor Fixer of ProblemsCommented:
That's almost exactly the setup I'm running except I'm using a switch instead of a router for the wired connection.  And I have more computers.  Connecting the wireless WAN input to the first router/switch puts the wireless DHCP on a different network segment which mostly prevents them from interacting which is what I wanted.
0
 
sjklein42Commented:
Maybe I'm missing something, but do you still need the 4-port wired router?  Just plug the DSL modem and the PCs into the wireless router.  It has 4 (wired) ports, right?

One router can handle both fixed IP clients and DHCP.

I agree with your decision to give the PCs fixed IPs.  It makes life much easier.
0
 
Aaron TomoskyTechnology ConsultantCommented:
The short answer is that your router will have an address like 192.168.0.1
It will hand out dhcp addresses starting at 192.168.0.100
Set your computers that need static ips between 192.168.0.2 - 192.168.0.99
0
Never miss a deadline with monday.com

The revolutionary project management tool is here!   Plan visually with a single glance and make sure your projects get done.

 
asiduCommented:
Your arrangement will work not an issue. Wireless machines can have a different network  from the wired network.
One advantage of such arrangement is that  you could put the 4 port wireless router at a strategic location which can cover the desired area. The area could be at a distance from the 4port router. The max length of the Cat5 cable between the wireless router and the 4 port wired router is the only constraint which have to note.

Category 5, UTP, 22 to 24 AWG
Maximum segment length .... 100m (328 ft.) for 100BaseTX
0
 
SteveHoggAuthor Commented:
Thanks!
Although I didn't state the reason for the setup (which I should have), it was exactly as Dave said. To keep the segments somewhat separate.
0
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
Thanks!
0
 
CompProbSolvCommented:
The layout you provided will keep the wired PCs from accessing the wireless ones, but will not keep the wireless from accessing the wired.

My assumptions here are that the WAN port of the wired router is connected to the modem and that a LAN port on the wired router connects to the WAN port of the wireless router.  I'm also assuming that no special setup is done on either router.

I agree with fixed IP addresses on the PCs, though I often use DHCP with reservations for the PCs.  That way they have consistent IP addresses, but I can control those addresses in the router.
0
All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.