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Ubuntu HTPC partition post-install

Posted on 2011-03-12
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Hi,

I have Ubuntu freshly installed on my HTPC. During setup, I chose "install on entire disk".

I was under the impression that Ubuntu was going to automatically partition my harddrive into some logical set. However after running the disk utility it appears to be 1 big partition of 1.5TB.

I tried to "format drive" but it gives me an error message due to the drive being busy.

Please help.

John
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Question by:JohnnyNZ
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yarwell earned 250 total points
ID: 35115870
If you want to repartition you'll have to run GParted or similar from a Live CD as you can't change the partition you are running from.

I would imagine it created one partition for / and a swap partition too ?
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by:droyden
ID: 35116136
Is this during the install? If so, and if you are happy there is nothing you want to keep on the hard drive just delete anything on there and you will be able to install
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by:bz43
ID: 35117296
I was under the impression that Ubuntu was going to automatically partition my harddrive into some logical set.
As of now it doesn't.  The default install creates one root partition for everything and a swap space partition.  You have to manually create separate partitions for "/" and "/home" and anything else you want.  This is done during installation; just select to manually partition your disk.

Or a more cumbersome way to go is what was already previously mentioned by yarwell: use gparted and resize.  Then create new partitions and mount points.  Then you may also need to edit the fstab file so the new partitions will properly mount when you boot up.  If you do it this way you may end up needing to run "blkid" on the command line to get the UUID's of your drives and add them to fstab.  fstab is in /etc
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by:bz43
ID: 35117317
I only meant cumbersome because you'll need to use the command line.  Otherwise gparted and what yarwell said is basically easy.  
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by:JohnnyNZ
ID: 35154606
Thanks!!
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