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Access 2010 SQL - Strange Connection Problem

Posted on 2011-03-12
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I up-sized a test Access 2010 db with three tables using Access and SQL Server Migration Assistant to a local SQL Server Express installation on my Win 7 64 bit system and to a hosted SQL Server 2008 db.   Both setups take 10 to 20 minutes to open a table of 462 rows.  The strange part is that I can open these same database from another 64bit win 7 computer on the network and they both open immediately without problem.  

Process to date:
1.  Ran the Microsoft online FixIt uninstall for Office 2003, 2007, and 2010.  Rebooted and reinstalled 2010 and tested both databases.  Same problem.
2. Removed all related ODBC 32 bit and 64 bit DSN entries and re-entered the 32 bit only.  No Change
3.  Removed fingerprint reader software and tested with no change ( MS Tech support reported that an HP Laptop had a similar problem caused by the fingerprint software)
4. Removed all other software that uses ODBC
5. Opened a case with a senior Microsoft tech support person for both SQL server and Access.   They have run a number of tests and have copies of the databases but have not found a solution after 3 weeks.  

The computer with the problem is a:
ASUS P5Q Premium MB
Intel Q6600 (not overclocked)
4 gb mem
2 WD 1tb drives in Raid 1 confg.
1 WD 2tb drive (non raid)

I have no other problems with this computer and Access database not linked to SQL run great. (including one with large tables over 500,000 rows.)

Currently the only solution appears to be a new workstation.    Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.


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Question by:Jim2009
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Expert Comment

by:Ryan McCauley
ID: 35118243
There are no other speed problems on this computer? So the only combination that's slow appears to be when you open THIS SQL-linked Access database from THIS workstation? That's an odd combination, and as far as I'm aware, different workstations with Access on them should connect to these remote tables in the same way, so I'm not sure what could make this connection different.

Using one of the slow workstations, can you create a new table and populate it with 500 rows or so? That way, you can see if it's tied to the up-converted table, or if it's the Access connection to that server in general.
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Accepted Solution

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Jim2009 earned 0 total points
ID: 35227300
Worked with MS Level 2 Tech and located the problem.  The ODBC SQL Trace was on.  Not sure how it got selected but everything work correctly as soon as it was turned off.   ryanmccauley, Thanks for your input.  
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Author Closing Comment

by:Jim2009
ID: 35292491
Had to use MS Tech support.
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