?
Solved

Getting back into coding, which version of Visual Studio should I focus on?

Posted on 2011-03-13
6
Medium Priority
?
333 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I've coded forever in VB6 and know it cold.  Now that that job is (finally!) over I need to update my skills and play catch up (by about 10 years...ouch).  I know that the .NET versions are a huge learning curve but I'm looking forward to it.  :)

As I've not followed the development and stability of newer versions and 2010 is about to be released, what are your recommendations as to which version to learn/focus on?  I'm also going to add coding to my consulting services once I'm up to speed - which version(s) are the majority of available jobs coded in and would learning 2010 and not knowing previous versions be a problem?  Also, VB or C++ since I have to basically learn so much from the ground up?
0
Comment
Question by:dcfollas
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 75

Accepted Solution

by:
käµfm³d   👽 earned 1200 total points
ID: 35123952
Excluding v 1.x, which a few people are still using (for some weird reason), v 2.0 is the foundation for all subsequent frameworks. 3.x added some new features (like WCF, WPF, & WF), but the core is relatively the same. 4.0 has added support for parallel programming (including working in the cloud).

As far as VS versions, if you want to work with the parallel stuff, then you'll need VS 2010; otherwise, you can safely use VS 2008 to handle 2.0- and 3.x-targeted applications. You can still make multi-threaded applications with VS 2008 and VS 2005, there's just going to be more work on your part as to thread management.

Here's a quick matrix of framework to VS version. Going down the list, any version will handle targeting a framework listed above it.

    VS          FW
    ===========
    2003      1.x
    2005      2.0
    2008      3.x
    2010      4.0
0
 
LVL 75

Expert Comment

by:käµfm³d 👽
ID: 35123979
I see I didn't expand on my 2nd paragraph...  I surely intended to.

Continuing, you would need to use VS 2008 to write WCF, WPF, or WF applications. 2005 will allow you to write basic console, forms, and ASP.NET applications.

Let me emphasize again, that going forward, you should be able to write the same kinds of applications you would write in an earlier version of VS with a newer version. So given what I said in the above paragraph, you can write WCF, WPF, and WF applications with VS 2010. In fact, VS 2010 itself was written as a WPF application.
0
 
LVL 16

Assisted Solution

by:Vikram Singh Saini
Vikram Singh Saini earned 400 total points
ID: 35125572
I'm also going to add coding to my consulting services once I'm up to speed

In that case I would recommend you to be updated with latest technology. And as far concerned with IDE you should (if it is feasible) use one that suits your requirements.

However it would be always nice idea to make your grounding strong from basic to advanced for strong concepts.

0
What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

 
LVL 44

Assisted Solution

by:AndyAinscow
AndyAinscow earned 400 total points
ID: 35125996
>>2010 is about to be released

Actually it was released quite a long time ago.  I'd go for that version.  VS2008 had a few problems (so I have read) and VS2005 is now very old.

ps.  You should be able to download the free express version (note it is purely for your own usage and a couple of things are missing from it compared to a commercial version) so you can test before purchase
0
 
LVL 75

Expert Comment

by:käµfm³d 👽
ID: 35127931
@AndyAinscow

>>  note it is purely for your own usage

I've heard and read otherwise otherwise. AF\AIK, the only limitations come in the form of what templates are installed and non-support for certain projects (e.g. mobile projects).
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:AndyAinscow
ID: 35128249
I understood you could not compile and distribute programs for commercial/business use, even giving them away could be problematic but one would need to read the licence agreement thoroughly
0

Featured Post

Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

The ECB site provides FX rates for major currencies since its inception in 1999 in the form of an XML feed. The files have the following format (reducted for brevity) (CODE) There are three files available HERE (http://www.ecb.europa.eu/stats/exch…
Calculating holidays and working days is a function that is often needed yet it is not one found within the Framework. This article presents one approach to building a working-day calculator for use in .NET.
Add bar graphs to Access queries using Unicode block characters. Graphs appear on every record in the color you want. Give life to numbers. Hopes this gives you ideas on visualizing your data in new ways ~ Create a calculated field in a query: …
In this video, Percona Solutions Engineer Barrett Chambers discusses some of the basic syntax differences between MySQL and MongoDB. To learn more check out our webinar on MongoDB administration for MySQL DBA: https://www.percona.com/resources/we…
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month9 days, 17 hours left to enroll

762 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question