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Replacing Nulls with 0

I have an access database which exports data out to an Excel spreadsheet.  Under certain conditions there may be Null values exported from the database which results in blank fields in the spreadsheet.  I want these blank cells to display 0.00 and have a numeric, not text, data type.  I am currently using the following code in Access to format the cells which display numeric values:  

Set xlRng = xlWs.Range(xlWs.Cells(2, 12), xlWs.Cells(x, z))
        xlRng.NumberFormat = "###,###,###,##0.00;[Red](###,###,###,##0.00)"
        Set xlRng = xlWs.Columns("I")
        xlRng.NumberFormat = "00"
        Set xlRng = xlWs.Columns("J")
        xlRng.NumberFormat = "###,###,###,##0;[Red](###,###,###,##0)"

Any help would be greatly appreciated
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cekendricks
Asked:
cekendricks
1 Solution
 
Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
if you are exporting a table, use a query against the table and export the query.

in the query, use nz([fieldName],0) for the field that may contain null values
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cekendricksAuthor Commented:
Yeah I already thought of that, but the problem is that I would have to change the fieldname in the query (ie newFieldName: Nz([FieldName], 0).  This would be just too time consuming to do as there are 12 queries (one for each month), with each query containing up to 100 fields that could potentially yield null values.  I figured that since they all have to be formatted once exported to the spreadsheet that this would be best place to search out and replace any Nulls.
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cekendricksAuthor Commented:
Well after searching some more I found this simple little snippet of code, which while it take a long time go through and clean up a 7,000 record spreadsheet, it nontheless does do the trick:

Sub BlankMe()
    For Each c In ActiveSheet.UsedRange
        If c.Value = "" Then c.Value = "-"
        c.HorizontalAlignment = xlCenter
    Next c
End Sub
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Jeffrey CoachmanCommented:
First,  the "0.00" is a "Format"
Access can only export the raw "0", it can't force a format in Excel.
So you can import the Zero, then simply format it in Excel (simple)
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Rob HensonIT & Database AssistantCommented:
You could do an Edit Replace on the dataset once in Excel. Select the data area and then run the Edit Replace function.

In the Find box - leave Blank
In the Replace With - type 0

Expand options if not already expanded and select the Match whole cells option.

This will be doing the same as the code you found but using an inbuilt function may do it quicker.

Cheers
Rob H
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Rob HensonIT & Database AssistantCommented:
My objection to cekendric solution is that the asker specifically asked for a numeric value and this solution would put text in the cell.

Regards
Rob H
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Rob HensonIT & Database AssistantCommented:
Therefore a simple change to the code would be

c.value = 0
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Patrick MatthewsCommented:
I agree that the recommended comment does not answer the question as asked, which required that all values be numeric.

While I also agree with cap1 in that the best practice is to control the output with the query, and thus use Nz, if the Asker is opposed to that then I would recommend using robhenson's approach suggested in http:#a35173368

Implementing that in VBA code would look something like this:

Sub Export()
    
    Dim xlApp As Object
    Dim xlWb As Object
    Dim xlWs As Object
    Dim r As Long
    Dim c As Long
    
    Const WbPath As String = "c:\Foo.xlsx"
    
    DoCmd.TransferSpreadsheet acExport, acSpreadsheetTypeExcel12Xml, "Table1", WbPath
    
    Set xlApp = CreateObject("Excel.Application")
    Set xlWb = xlApp.Workbooks.Open(WbPath)
    Set xlWs = xlWb.Worksheets(1)
    
    With xlWs
        r = .UsedRange.Rows.Count
        c = .UsedRange.Columns.Count
        .Range(.Cells(2, 1), .Cells(r, c)).Replace "", 0
    End With
    
    With xlWb
        .Save
        .Close
    End With
    Set xlWs = Nothing
    Set xlWb = Nothing
    xlApp.Quit
    Set xlApp = Nothing
    
    MsgBox "Done"
    
End Sub

Open in new window


Using the Replace method will be orders of magnitude faster than looping through the range and substituting null values with a zero, as in http:#a35713199

Patrick
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_alias99Commented:
All,
 
Following an 'Objection' by robhenson (at http://www.experts-exchange.com/Q_27024483.html) to the intended closure of this question, it has been reviewed by at least one Moderator and is being closed as recommended by the Expert.
 
At this point I am going to re-start the auto-close procedure.
 
Thank you,
 
_alias99
Community Support Moderator
0

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