Inner Class in Java

I compiled and run the code below, and the output is , "middle". Could you please explain why the code prints "middle" instead of "outer"?  I can understand why "inner" does not print because it comes after  - new A().m(); But "Outer" is in the beginning so it does not make sense why "Outer" does not print.

class A
{
	void m()
	{
		System.out.println("Outer");
	}
}

public class TestInners
{
	public static void main(String [] args)
	{
		new TestInners().go();
	}
	
	void go()
	{
		
		new A().m();
		class A
		{
			void m()
			{
				System.out.println("Inner");
			}
		}
	}
	
	class A
	{
		void m()
		{
			System.out.println("middle");
		}
	}
}

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techbroAsked:
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ksivananthConnect With a Mentor Commented:
this might help u understand this,

package test;

/**
 * TYPE DESCRIPTION HERE
 *
 */
class A
{
      void m()
      {
            System.out.println("Outer");
      }
}

public class TestInners
{
      test.A a = new test.A() ;
      public static void main(String [] args)
      {
            new TestInners().go();
      }
      
      void go()
      {
            a.m();
            System.out.println( A.class ) ;
            
            this.new A().m();
            class A
            {
                  void m()
                  {
                        System.out.println("Inner");
                  }
            }
            
            this.new A().m();
      }
      
      class A
      {
            void m()
            {
                  System.out.println("middle");
            }
      }
}
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rodnessCommented:
Within the scope of the go() method, the local class TestInners.A has precedence over the global class A.  As for the class that would print "inner", you are right, it hasn't been defined yet.

This is, of course, why reusing class names, even for inner classes, is a cause for confusion.
0
 
ksivananthCommented:
thats because the "this" reference is attached to it, it is as good as this.new A()
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techbroAuthor Commented:
Thank your for your response.

One more question before closing.
I tried your code, and it helped me understand how local class has more precedence more global class. It makes sense why the method prints "middle" in line 3, but why "this.new A().m()" prints "middle" in line 12. Without "this", it is printing "inner".

The code is given below:

void go()
{
            this.new A().m();
            class A
            {
                  void m()
                  {
                        System.out.println("Inner");
                  }
            }
            
            this.new A().m();
}

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rodnessConnect With a Mentor Commented:
With "this" it's going to reference the TestInners.A class ("middle").

Without "this", it's going to see the closest scoped A class, which is the one that was defined within the go() method ("inner").
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ksivananthCommented:
>>this.new A().m()" prints "middle" in line 12

this is same as test.new A(), simply overriding the default reference. if you simply say new A(), this will refer the inner class with in the go method. when you say this.new A(), you are overriding the default and telling the runtime to refer the class refered by TestInner( nothing but "this" )

>>Without "this", it is printing "inner".

see above
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ksivananthCommented:
compare it with pointing same file name located in different dir.
0
 
techbroAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your time!
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