Logon to Windows domain after workstation login

I have a number of laptops which need to access shared folders and printers on a windows domain, but the laptops themselves are not part of the domain.

At present, the users access each server individually using the UNC paths to shares, and they login using mydomain\myuser and their password.

Is there any way to login to the overall domain, so that the user would only need to enter credentials once to access all the resources of the domain? (Without actually joining the computers to the domain - this is not an option - the users are not employees of our company)

The workstations are a mix of XP, vista and windows 7. The domain controller is windows 2000.

Thanks in advance!
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SommerblinkConnect With a Mentor Commented:
This doesn't directly deal with your question, but I think it is sage advice:

I'm assuming that the bit about "they're not employees" means that these are private laptops?

As a matter of network security, any device which connects to the corporate network which you are hired to protect, should fall under the complete purview of your department. This does not sound like the case.

If that were my network, I would refuse to allow foreign (non-corporate controlled) devices to connect directly to the internal network. I would set up a separate network for contractor/visitor access at your facility, then use some sort of VPN technology to pinhole access to terminal servers for these people.

This will solve all of your above problems related to non-domain members access domain resources and will provide a rather generous level of protection that you don’t have now.
The only way for this to work is to do  \\nameofresource enter the login and password and check remember password.  Windows will store/save credentials for each resource accessed.
You could also map drives to the shares, and enter the domain credentials at the time the mapping is created. However, sometimes this can cause problems when the domain user's password is changed - for example, having to remap the drive.
I have to agree with Sommerblink - I give any consultants, visitors, etc. that come to my company a user account that can login to the terminal server and they have to access files that way.
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