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ESX VM migration and extending disk drives

Posted on 2011-03-15
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
So I'm trying to do a vm host & storage migration to another datastore and host. I also want to extend the vm drives and make them bigger. But for the life of me I can't figure out how to do this either through vmconverter 4.3 or through a straight migration. What i do know is that someone did do it and they did it as part of the migration process. This person isn't around right now and I need to know how to do this.
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Question by:iamuser
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danm66 earned 72 total points
ID: 35141306
With converter, it is under advanced options, or something like that, if you want to change the disk sizes.

You don't have to use Converter, though, you can just Edit Settings on the VM to increase the disk/.vmdk size and then use partition management tools (like diskpart, partitionmagic, etc...) to increase the partition sizes.
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by:iamuser
ID: 35141348
I was going to do a cold migration but with a cold migration the advance options does not allow me to change the disk size at all. Do i need to run it live in order to have that option?
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by:danm66
ID: 35141537
cold migration is not the same as Converter.  migration only changes the host or datastore, so you can migrate the VM and then edit the settings of the VM to increase the disk size...
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by:iamuser
ID: 35141662
I was going to convert the vm cold over to another host and store

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by:Luciano Patrão
Luciano Patrão earned 144 total points
ID: 35142551
Hi

Cold migration you have also the option to change the disk size.

Check my article, there is some print screens for the conversion. On the disk pictures, check the option to add a new disk size.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/VMWare/A_3639-VMware-vConverter-P2V-for-Windows-Servers.html

Jail
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by:coolsport00
coolsport00 earned 71 total points
ID: 35143731
If this is a system volume, you will need to do as "danm66" suggested as far as using 3rd party tools (Paragon, GParted, etc.); if it's a 2nd volume, and this is a Windows OS, you can simply pwr down the VM, change the disk size, pwr it back up, then use diskpart within Windows to repartition the volume (see MS KB: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/325590). Or, even if it is a system volume, you can always detach the virtual (hard) disk (**DO NOT DELETE IT FROM DISK**) from the VM, then re-add it as a 2nd volume to another VM and modify the size and use diskpart. Once the resize is complete, detach it from the 2nd VM and reattach to the 1st (original) VM. Before making a change, I would have a current backup or copy of the VM...just in case something messes up. I haven't yet had anything mess up (get corrupt) when modifying disk size, but have heard it happen from others.

Regards,
~coolsport00
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by:prak_seafarer
prak_seafarer earned 142 total points
ID: 35147433
disk size can be increased for a poweref off vm by editing configuration settings.
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by:Luciano Patrão
ID: 35148285
Hi

@prak_seafarer this only increase on VMware side, not on the VM guest OS side. For this need to follow what coolsport00 as already added.

Only for Windows 2008, Windows 7 or Vista, we can expand the disk without the need of Diskpart or any 3rd party partition tools

Jail
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by:prak_seafarer
prak_seafarer earned 142 total points
ID: 35148937
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/325590

disk expand can be used to expand other windows vm's. linux also does not need any 3rd party tools.
after disk expansion in linux we need to add the unassigned volume to the linux OS inside the VM.

VM migration to a bigger storage would not impact the VM so after all VM's are migrated, disk replacement.  addition can be done while vm's are running also.
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Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 35148956
Yes, diskpart can be used, but *ONLY* if the volume is a non-system volume. BTW...that is the same link I posted earlier.

~coolsport00
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Expert Comment

by:Luciano Patrão
ID: 35149650
Hi

@prak_seafarer in Windows or Linux guest, using or not 3rd party partition tools, or Diskpart, you always need to do this in the VM Gues OS side.

So edit VM settings with the VM power off or on, is not enough to expand a disk on the VM Guest OS.

Jail
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Author Comment

by:iamuser
ID: 35151866
Looks like I could extend the volume by using the Vmmware converter. All i had to was to edit the size of the existing disk up to the size I wanted and it worked. Even on the C:\

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Expert Comment

by:Luciano Patrão
ID: 35152095
Hi

Yes like I said is show in my article(not related with this, but have a step that can do this).

But still I think is easier to use a 3rd party partition tools, or Diskpart(if not a system disk).

But glade that you manage to do this.

Jail
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Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 35152229
Several choices for you really "iamuser". It's really up to you to decide what's easiest and most non-obtrusive for your org. Glad it's all worked out...

Regards,
~coolsport00
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Author Comment

by:iamuser
ID: 35152385
well with the vmconverter I don't have to do any of the Diskpart or any 3rd party paritioning tools. It's all done at the time of migration. I know it could be done I just didn't know where in the converter I could do it. I had to dig and experiment some more

I'm was very surprised  that no one



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Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 35153305
...surprised that no one suggested Converter? Well, I we normally we do, but just forgot, or got caught up in what was being discussed already. And honestly, doing it the other ways mentioned is quicker. It can be done in a few minutes as opposed to 1/2 hr or so (depending on VM virtual disk size). As long as you're up and going...that's what counts. :)

~coolsport00
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Assisted Solution

by:ornered
ornered earned 71 total points
ID: 35153877
I increase/decrease vm disks this way
1.      Defrag the disk and then power off the VM
2.      Edit the Settings for the VM (select the VM in the VI client and choose Edit Settings from the Summary tab, or right click menu lets you edit the settings too)
3.      Select the virtual disk you want to increase/decrease. A new field will be added under Capacity called New Size,
4.      Enter a new value that is larger/smaller then the current value.
5.      Configure the VM to boot from the GParted LiveCD or the partition tool CD of your choice.
(I use the "systemrescue 1.5.6" cd)
6.      Expand/decrease the VM’s disk partition
7.      Reboot the VM to it’s normal OS - if it’s a Winodws VM you will have to wait for a chkdsk to finish and another reboot and one reboot in widows after that.
Done it many times without problem.
:)
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Assisted Solution

by:Luciano Patrão
Luciano Patrão earned 144 total points
ID: 35155633
Hi

@iamuser if you check the article that I have added above, there is a part where you can change the disk size.

Since this is a P2V article, you can do this during the conversion of a physical machine, but you could also use in a "normal" configuration/conversion of the VM(in a V2V)

But like coolsport00 stated, you should use what is the best for your environment.

Jail
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Author Closing Comment

by:iamuser
ID: 35448913
Thanks for all the comments, the reason why I didn't want to use the gpart live cd is because it adds an extra step after my p2v. With the converter I can set it and let it all go as one process
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