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220/110 volt device Vs using adapter

Posted on 2011-03-15
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
is using a 220 V device in USA with a converter or using a 110 V in asia with a converter any less desirable than having a 110V device in asia and vice versa?

is there any cause for concern that the device will have more unstable pulses or any fuse to burn up?

the issue is: a device is desired to be used in asia but is available in usa in 110v. is it worth getting it with a converter or just not bother with it.

thanks
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Question by:anushahanna
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10 Comments
 
LVL 12

Accepted Solution

by:
silverkorn earned 288 total points
ID: 35143811
what kind of device is it?

it is easier, and safer, to decrease the amount of voltage available at the wall socket then it is to increase it. so to answer your question i would say you should be okay purchasing the device for use in 110 VAC and to purchase a secondary converter to convert the 220 VAC in asis
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LVL 21

Assisted Solution

by:Jason Yousef, MS
Jason Yousef, MS earned 288 total points
ID: 35143814
I would say try to find a 220 V just to save on the converter cost, but the performance will be the same, I had experience with that when I travel and some stuff needs 220 volt.

If you don't mind the cost then buy it with a converter, if it works fine the US then it'll work fine with a converter in Asia.

I bought a converter last time from Ebay, but found it cheaper @ http://www.dvdoverseas.com/voltage_converters.htm
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LVL 49

Assisted Solution

by:dbrunton
dbrunton earned 856 total points
ID: 35144002
You'll need a converter unless the device is one of those that is not fussy about what voltage it requires.  Check the manufacturer's specifications.  That is always your first step.

Some laptops for example aren't fussy at all about what voltages they are fed.  Again check manufacturer's specifications.

You might strike some problems with the frequency of the voltage.  See the wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltage_converter#Mains_converters on this but you'd have to have a very specialised device that was frequency dependent.
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LVL 32

Assisted Solution

by:aleghart
aleghart earned 568 total points
ID: 35144277
"device" doesn't mean anything.  If it's electronic, does it have a universal switching power supply?  Then it doesn't matter.  Many electronics will take input at 120VAC or 240VAC, some at 100VAC.  They will also take power at 50 or 60 Hz.

The only thing you have to do is get the correct cord or plug adapter to connect your local mains.  The PSU will handle the rest.
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LVL 6

Author Comment

by:anushahanna
ID: 35147988
I am thinking of a cordless telephone machine. so would the consensus be 'it does not matter'? go with what is the cheaper option?
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LVL 49

Assisted Solution

by:dbrunton
dbrunton earned 856 total points
ID: 35148186
That will probably have a power pack that converts AC to DC for operation.  If so (check manufacturer's specification to verify this) then you've probably got a number of options.

Look at manufacturer's specs.  They may have a universal power adaptor for it.  All you'd need is a converter to handle the different wall sockets in the countries concerned.

Or if it requires DC input you can probably buy a power converter in the other country to handle the power.
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LVL 6

Author Comment

by:anushahanna
ID: 35148780
dbrunton, would you feel most of the top line phones will fit into the category. i do not see any 220v phones there (because it is a usa site)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/electronics/172614/ref=pd_zg_hrsr_e_1_4_last
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LVL 49

Assisted Solution

by:dbrunton
dbrunton earned 856 total points
ID: 35149062
Possibly.

I'm on 240 volts and running a Panasonic KX-TG1311NZ cordless phone.

The charger is a 220-240 volt charger so it is not universal.  However it outputs 6.5 volts DC to the phone.  DC power supply units are very common.

However see http://www.world-import.com/panasonic-k-tg4024-world-wide-voltage-4-handset-cordless-phone.htm for a cordless phone that runs on any voltage.
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LVL 32

Assisted Solution

by:aleghart
aleghart earned 568 total points
ID: 35149220
Those wall warts are cheap.  If you like the device and you're spending a lot of time in one place, just pony up the $5-10 for the right spec power adapter.  Better to have the thing you like, than just buying something because it's less hassle.
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LVL 6

Author Comment

by:anushahanna
ID: 35169809
thank you.
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