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How to replace failed disk on Raid system?

Posted on 2011-03-16
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
hi guys

Our server has four disks, with raid 5. Recently a disk failed on our server. I replaced the faulty one with a new one.

Of course the array utility still says that it needs to be rebuilt or something? Basically how do I get the disk recognised and working in the same way the previous one was?

Thanks guys
Yahsy
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Question by:Yashy
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Accepted Solution

by:
Larry Struckmeyer MVP earned 167 total points
ID: 35146884
Various RAID controllers have different interfaces.  You may have a Windows application installed that will let you manage the array from within Windows, but if not, there should be a controller BIOS prompt to press CTRL+A or some such while the system is booting.  It is there that you manage the array if there is no Windows application installed.  I would not install the Windows
application if the array is in an unknow condition.

Depending on the controller, you may find that you should have removed the failed disk from the array before installing the new one.  I would look on the manufactures web site for instructions, or even call their support line.

Just a word to anyone else reading this.... this is one of those things that should be documented before the need arises.  The longer the RAID goes with one failed member, the greater the chances of a second failure, which will wipe out all the data on the array and require rebuilding the array as an empty vessel and restoring from bakup.
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Assisted Solution

by:Corlie008
Corlie008 earned 167 total points
ID: 35146893
Replace a disk region in the RAID-5 volumeUpdated: January 21, 2005

Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2


To replace a disk region in the RAID-5 volume
If the disk containing part of the RAID-5 volume cannot be reactivated and the volume does not return to the Healthy status, you should replace the failed disk region in the RAID-5 volume.

Using the Windows interface


Using a command line


Using the Windows interface
1.Open Computer Management (Local).


2.In the console tree, click Computer Management (Local), click Storage, and then click Disk Management.


3.Right-click the portion of the RAID-5 volume on the failed disk, click Repair Volume, and then follow the instructions on your screen.


Notes

To perform this procedure on a local computer, you must be a member of the Backup Operators group or Administrators group on the local computer, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority. To perform this procedure remotely, you must be a member of the Backup Operators group or Administrators group on the remote computer. If the computer is joined to a domain, members of the Domain Admins group might be able to perform this procedure. As a security best practice, consider using Run as to perform this procedure. For more information, see Default local groups, Default groups, and Using Run as.


To open Computer Management, click Start, click Control Panel, double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.


To replace a disk region in the RAID-5 volume, you must have a dynamic disk with unallocated space that is at least as large as the region to repair. If you do not have a dynamic disk with enough unallocated space, the Repair Volume command is unavailable. (To verify that you have enough space, right-click the disk, click Properties, and then check the size in Unallocated Space. This size may be slightly smaller than shown in the graphical and list views.)


When a member of a RAID-5 volume fails in a severe manner (such as a loss of power or a complete hard disk failure), computers running Windows Server 2003 operating systems can regenerate the data from the remaining members of the RAID-5 volume.


If the RAID-5 failure is due to a power or cabling failure on a single device, you can regenerate the data within the failed member of the RAID-5 volume once the hardware state is restored.


The RAID-5 volume will not display Healthy status in Disk Management until regeneration is complete.


You can only regenerate RAID-5 volumes with Failed Redundancy status. If the RAID-5 volume has Failed status, try to return it to Failed Redundancy status by using the Reactivate Disk command on the remaining disks.


Using a command line
1.Make sure that the physical disk is turned on, plugged in, and attached to the computer. If necessary, turn on or reattach the physical disk.


2.Open Command Prompt.


3.Type:

diskpart


4.At the DISKPART prompt, type:

list volume

Make note of the volume number of the RAID-5 volume with Failed Rd status.


5.At the DISKPART prompt, type:

list disk

Make note of the number of the dynamic disk you want to use to repair the RAID-5 volume.


6.At the DISKPART prompt, type:

select volume n


7.At the DISKPART prompt, type:

repair disk=N

Using the list volume command, you can check the status of the RAID-5 volume while it is being regenerated. During regeneration, the volume status is Rebuild, and after regeneration, the volume status is Healthy.


 
Value  Description  
list volume
 Displays a list of basic and dynamic volumes on all disks.
 
list disk
 Displays a list of disks and information about them, such as their size, amount of available free space, whether the disk is a basic or dynamic disk, and whether the disk uses the master boot record (MBR) or GUID partition table (GPT) partition style. The disk marked with an asterisk (*) has focus.
 
select volume
 Selects the specified volume, where n is the volume number, and gives it focus. If no volume is specified, the select command lists the current volume with focus. You can specify the volume by number, drive letter, or mount point path. On a basic disk, selecting a volume also gives the corresponding partition focus.
 
repair disk= N
 Repairs the RAID-5 volume with focus by replacing the failed RAID-5 member with the specified dynamic disk, N. The specified dynamic disk must have free space greater than or equal to the total size of the failed RAID-5 member.
 

Notes

To perform this procedure on a local computer, you must be a member of the Backup Operators group, Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority. If the computer is joined to a domain, members of the Domain Admins group might be able to perform this procedure. As a security best practice, consider using Run as to perform this procedure. For more information, see Default local groups, Default groups, and Using Run as.


To open a command prompt, click Start, point to All programs, point to Accessories, and then click Command prompt.


To replace a disk region in the RAID-5 volume, you must have a dynamic disk with unallocated space that is at least as large as the region to repair. If you do not have a dynamic disk with enough unallocated space, the Repair Volume command is unavailable. (To verify that you have enough space, right-click the disk, click Properties, and then check the size in Unallocated Space. This size may be slightly smaller than shown in the graphical and list views.)


When a member of a RAID-5 volume fails in a severe manner (such as a loss of power or a complete hard disk failure), computers running Windows Server 2003 operating systems can regenerate the data from the remaining members of the RAID-5 volume.


If the RAID-5 failure is due to a power or cabling failure on a single device, you can regenerate the data within the failed member of the RAID-5 volume once the hardware state is restored.


The RAID-5 volume will not display Healthy status in Disk Management until regeneration is complete.


You can only regenerate RAID-5 volumes with Failed Redundancy status. If the RAID-5 volume has Failed status, try to return it to Failed Redundancy status by using the Reactivate Disk command on the remaining disks.


For more information about DiskPart, see Related Topics.


Information about functional differences
Your server might function differently based on the version and edition of the operating system that is installed, your account permissions, and your menu settings. For more information, see Viewing Help on the Web.

MS Technet: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc738360(WS.10).aspx

Or

Microsoft Windows Server 2008 includes many fault tolerance features designed to protect data when hardware, software or network failures occur. The RAID 5 technology included with Windows Server 2008 protects data by writing parity information along with data to an array of hard drives that enables the RAID array and information to be rebuilt in the event of a single drive failure. Replace a failed hard drive in a Windows Server 2008 software RAID 5 array using built-in utilities that are included with the Windows operating system.

Difficulty:ModerateInstructions
things you'll need:
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 computer with a software RAID 5 storage array
Credentials of an account that has Administrator permissions on the Windows Server 2008 computer
1
Shutdown the Windows Server 2008 computer. Install a new hard drive that is the same model and make as the failed hard drive Boot the computer and then log in using the credentials of an account that has Administrator permissions on the Windows Server 2008 computer.

2
Select the "Start" button on the Windows Server 2008 PC desktop and then select the "Search" box. Enter "cmd" in the "Search" box and tap the "Enter" key. Enter "diskpart" on the command line and tap the "Enter" key. Enter "list disk" at the command prompt and tap the "Enter" key. Write down the new disk number listed under the "Disk ###" column displayed on the command line. Enter "select disk 5" on the command line, replacing the "5" with the new hard drive disk number. Then enter "convert dynamic" on the command line and tap the "Enter" key.

3
Select the "Start" button and then select the "Search" box. Enter "diskmgmt.msc" in the "Search" box and tap the "Enter" key. Right-click the disk labeled "Online (Errors)" or "Failed" in the lower portion of the "Disk Management" window and select "Remove volume" in the drop-down menu.

4
Right-click the new drive labeled as "Unallocated" in the "Disk Management" window and select "Repair volume" in the drop-down menu. Rebuild will commence to complete the RAID 5 repair process.

http://www.ehow.com/how_7482280_remove-disk-raid-5-software.html
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Expert Comment

by:Muzafar Momin
ID: 35146915
use Raid software (like for dell it is System Adminstrator) or restart the server go to bios of raid controller and rebuild
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Assisted Solution

by:RajeshVKrishnan
RajeshVKrishnan earned 166 total points
ID: 35147041
Hi,

Before replacing the Hard disk on the server.
Kindly confirm 2 things- RAID is software or Hardware configured.
*Most of the server vendors will configure Hardware RAID on the Controller Level to avoid DATA Loss & OS Corruption.

If RAID is configured in the Controller level.
Check the Controller BIOS option during POST.
Ctrl A - SCSI Controller card
Ctrl R - LSI RAID Controller Card
Ctrl C - SAS Controller card

Once entered into Controller BIOS, Check the Physical Disk status
1.If replaced HDD shows Ready, then configure as Hot Spare to initiate the rebuilding process.
2.If replaced HDD shows Failed, Kindly call Server vendor to check for any mismatch between NVRAM & disk configuration.
3.If replaced HDD not detected, Check with any available Empty slot on the server to check the Hard disk status(Ready/Failed/Not Present).
Follow the steps 1 & 2.
4. If the Hard disk is not detected in another empty slot also, probably the replaced hard disk would be also faulty.


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Author Comment

by:Yashy
ID: 35148369
Hey man,

The server is hardware raided. Also, it's a server 2008. I shouldn't have posted in the 2003 section, but either way will give points as you've both gone out of your way:)

So do I have to put the disk in and reboot the system? It's a hot-swap drive.
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