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Hash Partition

Posted on 2011-03-16
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If I have a table with 45 columns what critera should I use to determine which columns to include in the partition by hash clause?
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Question by:msimons4
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Akenathon earned 500 total points
ID: 35149653
You might be confusing hash partitioning methods with a hash cluster. What's your goal? Why are you choosing partitioning? Which business need are you trying to accomplish?
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by:msimons4
ID: 35150132
I am trying to speed up full table scans. I thought when you hash partition a table you select which columns you want to partition:

CREATE TABLE invoices
(invoice_no    NUMBER NOT NULL,
 invoice_date  DATE   NOT NULL,
 comments      VARCHAR2(500))
PARTITION BY HASH (invoice_no)
(PARTITION invoices_q1 TABLESPACE users,
 PARTITION invoices_q2 TABLESPACE users,
 PARTITION invoices_q3 TABLESPACE users,
 PARTITION invoices_q4 TABLESPACE users);

in this case: PARTITION BY HASH (invoice_no)
If I have 45 columns what do I base which columns to PARTITION BY HASH
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by:Akenathon
Akenathon earned 500 total points
ID: 35151840
You won't speed up FTSs by hashing. On the contrary, (any kind of) hashing is useful when you are looking for exact matches.

If your table is big, you should aim to avoid FTSs and do indexed (or hashed) accesses. What's the query you'd like to speed up? Does it absolutely need a FTS? Prove it and we can talk about speeding up FTSs if you have no choice...
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