Solved

Import thousands of worksheet columns into Access table

Posted on 2011-03-16
5
464 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I have a Excell Spreadsheet that has over 5,000 worksheets. Each worksheet has the same exact number of column and column names; and each worksheet has at least one row of data. I'm currently using the following VB code to import but it is extremely, extremely slow:
 
Const acImport = 0
Const acSpreadsheetTypeExcel9 = 8

Set objAccess = CreateObject("Access.Application")
objAccess.OpenCurrentDatabase "C:\SomeFolder\data.accdb"

Set objExcel = CreateObject("Excel.Application")
objExcel.Visible = True

strFileName = "C:\SomeFile\File.xlsx"

Set objWorkbook = objExcel.Workbooks.Open(strFileName)
Set colWorksheets = objWorkbook.Worksheets

For Each objWorksheet in colWorksheets 
    Set objRange = objWorksheet.UsedRange 
    strWorksheetName = objWorksheet.Name & "!" & objRange.Address(False, False) 
    objAccess.DoCmd.TransferSpreadsheet acImport, acSpreadsheetTypeExcel9, _
        "Vulnerability", strFileName, True, strWorksheetName
Next

Open in new window

Does anyone know a faster or more effecient way to get this done?

(Excel and Access 2007)
0
Comment
Question by:thomasd04
  • 3
  • 2
5 Comments
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:HainKurt
ID: 35150083
what about putting all rows into one worksheet with worksheetname in another column
then load all data to db in one shot!
0
 
LVL 3

Author Comment

by:thomasd04
ID: 35150795
Hi HainKurt. I'm not quite sure what you are suggestion. Could you clarify a bit more? Right now the spreadsheet is being created by an external application and we are unable to modify how it outputs to Excel. Now that it's been outputted in this format, I need to find a way to get it into a database.
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:HainKurt
ID: 35151168
what I say is, instead of loading each worksheet into db one by one,
create a new excel file with one worksheet
then with vba code, collect all data from worksheets and put into the new excel file (add a new column to store worksheetname)
then load this worksheet into db in one shot...
0
 
LVL 3

Author Comment

by:thomasd04
ID: 35151194
ahhhh...okay. That makes sense. Could you help me with the code? I'm not good with VB, it took me forever to write the little code I posted above.
0
 
LVL 51

Accepted Solution

by:
HainKurt earned 500 total points
ID: 35151205
like this


strFileName = "C:\SomeFile\File.xlsx"
strTargetFileName = "C:\SomeFile\output.xlsx"

Set objWorkbook = objExcel.Workbooks.Open(strFileName)
Set objWorkbookNew = objExcel.Workbooks.Open(strTargetFileName)
Set colWorksheets = objWorkbook.Worksheets

For Each objWorksheet in colWorksheets 
    Set objRange = objWorksheet.UsedRange 
    strWorksheetName = objWorksheet.Name & "!" & objRange.Address(False, False) 
     ... copy data into objWorkbookNew, with one worksheet with name say data, with e3xtra column = strWorksheetName ...
Next 

objAccess.DoCmd.TransferSpreadsheet acImport, acSpreadsheetTypeExcel9, _
        "Vulnerability", strTargetFileName, True, "data"

Open in new window

0

Featured Post

Three Reasons Why Backup is Strategic

Backup is strategic to your business because your data is strategic to your business. Without backup, your business will fail. This white paper explains why it is vital for you to design and immediately execute a backup strategy to protect 100 percent of your data.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This tutorial explains how to create a series of drop-down lists that are dependent upon prior selections to guide (“force”) the user to make the correct selection and reduce data errors within Microsoft Excel. Excel 2010 was used for this tutorial;…
In a multiple monitor setup, if you don't want to use AutoCenter to position your popup forms, you have a problem: where will they appear?  Sometimes you may have an additional problem: where the devil did they go?  If you last had a popup form open…
This Micro Tutorial demonstrates how to create Excel charts: column, area, line, bar, and scatter charts. Formatting tips are provided as well.
This Micro Tutorial will demonstrate how to use longer labels with horizontal bar charts instead of the vertical column chart.

856 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question