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Wireless connected but not to internet

I have a wirless network,

I connect to the network and get issued with valid ip, sub, gateway and dns.

running wpa/wpa2 personal

I cannot ping the gateway or get internet acess.
I have tried many different routers.
All other computers are fine.
Running vista.
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SDTech92037
Asked:
SDTech92037
1 Solution
 
sjklein42Commented:
From Microsoft:


Ping the loopback address to verify that TCP/IP is installed and correctly configured on the local computer. To do this, type the following command:

ping 127.0.0.1

If the loopback test fails, the IP stack is not responding. This problem may occur if any one or more of the following conditions is true:

The TCP drivers are corrupted.
The network adapter is not working.
Another service is interfering with IP.

Ping the IP address of the local computer to verify that the computer was correctly added to the network. If the routing table is correct, this procedure just forwards the packet to the loopback address of 127.0.0.1. To do this, type the following command:

ping IP address of local host

If the loopback test succeeds but you cannot ping the local IP address, there may be an issue with the routing table or with the network adapter driver.

Ping the IP address of the default gateway to verify that the default gateway is working and that you can communicate with a local host on the local network. To do this, type the following command:

ping IP address of default gateway

If the ping fails, you may have an issue with the network adapter, the router or gateway device, the cabling, or other connectivity hardware.



http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314067
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lancecurwensvilleCommented:
Continuing on the same path as sjklein42, if you are unable to complete the loopback test, you could have an issue with the ip protocol itself.  KB299357 walks you through manually resetting this and provides a microsoft "fix it for me" solution that you can download to a flash drive or cd and transfer to this computer.   http://support.microsoft.com/kb/299357

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pitchfordCommented:
I don't intend on insulting you, but when you say you're getting a valid IP; are you getting a 169.#.#.# address? I have techs working with me that have been doing PC support for 10 years and didn't know what that address was.

If you are getting a 169.#.#.# address, then you may want to check your DHCP settings and/or your encryption. Make sure you haven't limited yourself in regards to DHCP addresses. I've seen setups where the maximum DHCP pool was 10 addresses and the 11th device failed... =) Took me a while to figure that one out.

On a different note, in troubleshooting I always disable as much as possible so in this case I'd disable the encryption to test functionality.
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