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administrator.mydomain appears on my windows 2003 standard server

Posted on 2011-03-17
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Hey Guys...

So something crazy just happened on my server.

We got an error saying low drive space... I cleared the temp folder and gave me 2 gigs back.  That's not the problem.

What I noticed is that under documents and settings on the server, there is an additional account on there called administrator.mydomain (don't want to say my real domain).

I go into that folder and find just standard files and icons.  

When I go back into docs and settings and go under the regular "administrator" account, I find all my icons and everything else.

When I shutdown and restart, log in... It logs me into the administrator.mydomain account instead of then normal one.

I would love to find the cause, but now I just need a solution in order to get us back up and running.  I know there is no "system restore" for windows server 2003, So I just need to know how I can bring it back to logging in with the regular Administrator account instead of administrator.mydomain...

There is no way to log in "locally" on the server anyway, so I don't understand why it would create the administrator.mydomain.

Anything you can do to help me quickly is greatly greatly appreciated.

Thanks!


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Question by:mtech-clint
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by:oBdA
ID: 35160797
You are logging on with the exact same account as before--you just have a new profile, because the old one got corrupted during the drive space error, so Windows created a new one.
Just copy whatever files you need from the old profile into the new one (check whatever you copy: again, the files might be corrupted), and customize the current profile to your likings.
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by:mtech-clint
ID: 35160849
But there are registry entries for the old profile that are not in the new one.  How do I transfer that over? And it won't let me copy over files to this profile while I am logged into this profile.

But...

It doesn't look like the old account was corrupted.  Everything is still there.

There isn't any way for me to tell the server to log into that account instead???
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oBdA earned 500 total points
ID: 35160949
Again: you are not working with a new account. Your account just has a new profile, just as if it had logged on for the first time.
The most likely thing to have gone overboard is actually the old HKCU registry part (ntuser.dat in the old profile folder).
Just copy over the files you actually need (most likely the "My documents" folder), do not try to copy from the root of the profile.
Windows wouldn't have created a new profile if the old one was still working.
If you happen to have a backup of the C: drive that was taken, you can try to restore the old profile folder to a new location.
Log off from the server, connect remotely to C$, copy the content of the restored folder into the new profile folder. Reboot if you get errors during the copy, then the profile wasn't unloaded fully during the logoff.
The account-to-profile mapping is stored in HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList\<Your SID>, "ProfileImagePath", but I'd advise against manipulating it. You're likely to just create a third profile (probably Administrator.001) when you logon again.
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Author Closing Comment

by:mtech-clint
ID: 35178468
"The account-to-profile mapping is stored in HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList\<Your SID>, "ProfileImagePath", but I'd advise against manipulating it. You're likely to just create a third profile (probably Administrator.001) when you logon again."

All I needed was that registry key...  

1. I logged in using another user account that had admin rights... Deleted the administrator.mydomain folder in documents and settings (actually I couldn't delete the folder, I had to leave the ntuser.dat because it wouldn't delete it)

2. went into the registry and deleted the administrator.mydomain SID from the key you provided (exported the key first to cover my a$$)...

3. reboot...

logged back in as administrator and I'm back to my original folder... success... ;-)
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