Will Windows allow access to anything dangerous when sharing the C drive?

Hi Experts,

Running a piece of software that will be hosted on a Windows 7 machine (it will be acting as the server) and shared among a handful of workstations.  The instructions for the software call for sharing the C drive on the machine acting as the server with everyone (checked with the software people and verified that's what they intended). Tried it on a test machine, doesn't seem like a huge deal because Windows 7 still seems to block access to the major folders (windows, program files, etc).  However, still thought I'd check with the experts and see if there is anything they can access potentially damaging to the Windows 7 machine acting as the server (besides obviously the data, but that's shared on the network anyway).  Any thoughts there?  

Thanks!

JsmplyAsked:
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aleghartConnect With a Mentor Commented:
>Will Windows allow access to anything dangerous when sharing the C drive?

Yes.  The C: drive.

I can see no reason to ever share a C: (system) drive) to users.  The C$ admin share is sufficient for administrators.  A folder-level share should be good enough for network users.

What is the software?
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BCipolloneConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Obvioulsy virus' can always cause damage and there is not much you can do to prevent that aside from freezing the OS.

You should check to see if you can create a folder to give the program access to instead of the root of c. This way you can control the permissions easily without worrying about the OS.

Or see if you can create a seperate partition and have the program use that partition instead.
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JsmplyAuthor Commented:
Thx! Agreed, going to tell the software developer it's a no go . . . they were just prefering it because their software instructions and mapping is designed around it.  Thanks!
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JsmplyAuthor Commented:
For those still following, please see this thread.  That's what I was wondering, if the machines are peer to peer and have matching logins, how is this any different than if you only share specific folders, but still have access via \\hostpc\c$?  http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Windows/Windows_7/Q_26895420.html#a35162685
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aleghartCommented:
If you have identical logins, are using sime shares with access to everything, and are disregarding basic security...then there's little difference.

Why bother about what is/isn't accessible?  Just burn a backup image so you can restore each machine if/when it gets trashed.  And keep backups on an offline location.
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JsmplyAuthor Commented:
Thanks.  Yes the important machines are fully ghosted daily so it's not a huge concern then. Thanks.
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JsmplyAuthor Commented:
Thanks.  Yes the important machines are fully ghosted daily so it's not a huge concern then. Is there a way though to ONLY share certain folders to other computers even if the machines have identical logins?  Or will the c$ share always let you through?
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aleghartCommented:
If all computers are peers and share administrator-level logins, then no.  Give them user-level logins, and they can't see admin-level ($) shares.
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