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How to replace harddrives on RAID 0 Windows Server 2003 Standard Terminal Server

Posted on 2011-03-18
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I have a terminal server sporting Windows Server 2003 Standard. I've been getting some errors from the RAID card that once every 4 or 5 days its getting bad sectors or something and it recommends replacing the hard drives. If I wanted to replace the hard drives how would I do that on the RAID 0? I think I'm going to have to install from scratch and restore a back? Anyone have an idea? The backups are failing and I'm thinking it has to do with the bad hard drives.
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Question by:sagetechit
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7 Comments
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:wwakefield
ID: 35167261
What brand of server?  

If the drives are hot swappable, change them one at a time allowing them time to rebuild before doing the next.

Your GUI should be rather informative on the progress during that.

Worse case, you have to power down, replace a drive and allow it time to rebuild.  

In sime cases there are prompts during POST that you must follow in lieu of a gui.

GRAB THE CONTROLLER MANUAL AND READ UP FIRST.  If you give me the make/model fo the server and controller I can dig it up.   I am an HP user primarily.
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by:multifunctional
ID: 35167276
Yeah, unfortunately you have to do it from scratch. Try creating an image with Acronis or something similar, replace the drives, recreate the RAID volume, then restore. You can use an Acronis boot CD to restore the image if your system partition is on the same volume and you can't boot. Stay away from RAID0 in general.
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Expert Comment

by:Seth Simmons
ID: 35167296
RAID 0 is striping with no parity or mirror.
If your RAID 0 array fails, you loose the volume.  You cannot replace a hot swappable disk in a RAID 0 and get your data back; there is nothing to rebuild from.

I would suggest replacing the failing drive(s) and rebuilding on RAID 1.  Do not use RAID 0 in production.
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by:wwakefield
ID: 35167325
My bust...    Failure to read properly.
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Expert Comment

by:it_saige
ID: 35167369
Agreed with multifunctional.

Just to illustrate.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_RAID_levels

RAID 0 - 2 or more drives combined to virutally look like one drive.
RAID 1 - 2 or more drives mirrored to virtually look like one drive.

RAID 5 is usually the most common RAID configuration.

-saige-
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Accepted Solution

by:
David earned 2000 total points
ID: 35168141
Not only that, but you are missing an even bigger problem, which you are now seeing, which is root cause.  You are getting bad blocks, i.e., unrecoverable read errors.  Every one of these means you lost a little bit of data.   RAID1 also protects against that.  If the disk that the RAID controller used to grab the data can't read the block, the controller just gets it from the mirror, then rewrites the correct data to the disk it originally tried.


So really, RAID1 is not just to protect against an inevitable drive failure, it would have protected you against incremental data loss.  So right now you DO have some data loss and corruption and busted up files.  The data is gone forever.  So you MUST do full backup,  build a RAID1 (or RAID10 which means buying 2 more disks, or 2 larger disks), then restore.  This will prevent these problems.

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Author Closing Comment

by:sagetechit
ID: 35310142
Got it.
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