Last command in the UNIX shell prompt

In UNIX shell prompt what key do I need to type to get the last command executed?

If I press arrow it writes these characters on the prompt: ^[[A
# echo $SHELL
/sbin/sh
# ^[[A
^[[A: not found
#

toookiAsked:
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larsrohrConnect With a Mentor Commented:
OK, then.  I would recommend that you don't change the root default shell.

When you become root, then you can start bash, and then load your aliases into your bash shell:

# bash
# . /home/mylogin/.profile

Doing it this way, you shouldn't need that up arrow definition, since that's built in to bash.
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larsrohrCommented:
/sbin/sh doesn't maintain a command history for you to scroll back through.

You can change your default shell to bash or tcsh, which both use the arrow keys for stepping through command history.  Or you could just type 'bash' to startup the shell for your current session; then any commands you do once bash is started can be stepped through with the arrow keys.
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paulqnaCommented:
If your /sbin/sh supports it then "fc -l" is a good start.
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woolmilkporcCommented:
If your /sbin/sh is indeed a link to ksh, you could do this:

Add to your $HOME/.profile or to /etc/profile

alias __A=$(echo "\020")   # up arrow = ^p
alias __B=$(echo "\016")   # down arrow = ^n
alias __C=$(echo "\006")   # right arrow = ^f
alias __D=$(echo "\002")   # left arrow = ^b

and

set -o emacs

Now logout, login again and retry.

wmp
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toookiAuthor Commented:
Thank you for all your help.

How do I switch "default shell to bash"? Could it be done in .profile file.

/bin/bash takes me to the bash profile where arrow keys works. But after switching to bash none of my aliases work.

yes I set fc -l for history but just wanted to reduce my time for commands -- if I make a spelling mistake in a huge command I need to retype that again --- arrow key could save the time.

I set these entries in .profile file but arrow keys did not work after that (I logged out and logged back in)

alias __A=$(echo "\020")   # up arrow = ^p
alias __B=$(echo "\016")   # down arrow = ^n
alias __C=$(echo "\006")   # right arrow = ^f
alias __D=$(echo "\002")   # left arrow = ^b
set -o emacs
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larsrohrCommented:
Which distribution of unix/linux are you using?  Solaris?

Some distros have a 'chsh' command for changing your shell -- but for user 'root', you really want to stick with a rather plain shell, one that has few dependencies and can be counted on to work when all else is failing.

Since it appears that you are dealing with a root user, I would suggest that you leave the default shell for 'root' as /sbin/sh, and instead make your aliases work for you when you manually invoke /bin/bash.  Where do you currently define your aliases?  If you add them to ~/.bashrc, you may just solve your problem.
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toookiAuthor Commented:
Thank you.

# uname -a
SunOS halter37 5.8 Generic_108528-29 sun4u sparc SUNW,Ultra-5_10

So it is Solaris 8.

When I become root I type in . /home/mylogin/.profile to use my aliases. As root profile does not have any aliases.
I define all my aliases in .profile file.
In the .profile file I also have this line:
ENV=$HOME/.kshrc
export ENV

I defined the aliases alias __A=$(echo "\020")   # up arrow = ^p in the .profile file but that did nit work.
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toookiAuthor Commented:
Thank you.

Thank you all for help.

# bash
# . /home/mylogin/.profile

The above worked perfectly.
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