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How can I disable the local Group Policy that prevents all users from accessing a server's drives, control panel, etc.?

Posted on 2011-03-21
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
How can I disable the local Group Policy that prevents all users from accessing a server's drives, control panel, etc.?

Currently whenever a user is logged onto the server using Remote Desktop, the user has no access to the Control Panel, the Run command, the local server drives, etc.

Furthermore, if the user opens up a command prompt and types in Control.exe, the user receives an error message that says “This operation has been cancelled due to restrictions in effect on this computer. Please contact your system administrator.” (see the screenshot).

The only user that can make any changes to the server is the local administrator account.

Even though a particular user has been given local administrator rights and his domain account has been given domain administrator rights, enterprise administrator rights, and schema administrator rights, he still has these restrictions and receives these error messages when trying to launch command-line commands.

I need to be able to make a particular change to a user's Windows profile and can only make this change while this user is logged on.

currently I am logged onto this server as the local administrator (which has the full ability to make any and all changes to the server).

I have opened the local group policy editor (gpedit.msc) and am looking for the place to temporarily lift this restriction so that I can then log back on as this domain user, and make the settings change. I will then log back on as the local administrator account and will change group policy setting that I have temporarily changed back to its original setting and will also remove all of the excessive administrator rights that I have temporarily given this particular domain user.

My question is: exactly which local Group Policy setting do I need to change? Where exactly do I find it in the gpedit.msc Group Policy console?

This is a Windows Server 2003 member server that is part of a Windows Server 2003 network.
Restrictions.png
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Question by:Knowledgeable
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MarkieS earned 167 total points
ID: 35185525
When logged in as the specified user can you do a RUNAS to elvate the users rights by running it as the local administrator?
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by:amichaell
amichaell earned 167 total points
ID: 35185538
Open your Group Policy Management Console (gpmc.msc), select a Policy, and click on the Settings tab.  That will show you exactly what policies are enabled/disabled in that particular GPO.  Most of the items you are referring to are scattered under User Configuration -> Administrative Templates (Control Panel, Start Menu and Taskbar, etc).
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by:j0shTech
j0shTech earned 166 total points
ID: 35185563
I reccomend strongly to start out by logging in as the user you want to change to policy for
once logged in, open up a command prompt and run
"gpresult /r"
this will spit out a lot of stuff if you look through the results you will see which group policies are applied and which ones are denied.
from there you can go to group policy management and change the security or inheritance.
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