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linux

Posted on 2011-03-22
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hi guys

starting to play around with linux. installed ubuntu, what other ones are there for free? is red hat for desktop for free?

is there any package i can install to work with ms exchange 2003? and does anyone know of any terminal emulator that supports wyse 60 emulation that will work on ubuntu etc??
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Question by:mikeleahy
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rindi earned 250 total points
ID: 35187995
Most linux distro's are free, but not Red-Hat or SUSE. You can download trial versions of those OS's, but after the trial period has ended you won't be able to get updates.

Both, Red-Hat and SUSE have have community based free versions on which their commercial versions are based on, ie Fedora (Red-Hat) and OpenSUSE (SUSE). Both of these Distro's are bleeding edge and much more up-to-date than the Red-Hat or SUSE distro's are, but they can also be less stable.

There are also Red-Hat Clones available, CentOS is one (but they haven't yet come up with a Clone of the newest Red-Hat Distro which only came out recently).

Also Ubuntu is a base for many other Spin-offs, the best such spin-off based on Ubuntu in my opinion is Linux Mint. It's advantage is that it includes so called "Non-Free" things like legacy drivers and Codecs. That means more things will work "Out-of-the-Box" than when compared to the normal Ubuntu. That doesn't mean you can't install those options on Ubuntu, but there you have to add the extra repositories to the package Manager and then select what you need and install them yourself, which is more work. Non-Free in the Linux world means that it isn't OpenSource, but it doesn't mean you have to pay for it. It's just the licensing that is different. With Opensource Products you could add or change the code so it suits you better, while that isn't allowed with non-free stuff (you don't get the source code for those products).

For a list of distro's you can download and test checkout Distrowatch:

http://distrowatch.com

About the wyse terminal emulation I don't know anything, but there are many terminal emulators available, and probably most of them can be customized for your needs.
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by:rindi
ID: 35188014
Forgot about your exchange Question, you can use evolution for that, there is a connector for exchange.
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by:asidu
ID: 35188056
You could also test the linux live Cds. You dont have to install them on to your machine.
This programs run off the CDs. They are good for testing hardware and getting the feel of what is available.

Check out http://www.livecdlist.com/ 
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by:rindi
ID: 35188092
Actually many or most Linux distro's come as liveCD's, including Ubuntu and Linux-Mint, and most of these can also be put on USB sticks which boot and run faster, for that you need unetbootin (there is a windows version and Linux versions, I believe in ubuntu it is already included in the default installation...).
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by:mikeleahy
ID: 35188130
i am looking to cut costs on a few computers in a warehouse. no functionality needed except for evolution, internet , printing and a terminal emulator to connect to a  warehouse system

what would you recommend for this?
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by:asidu
ID: 35188334
You could install (Ubuntu or Redhat Fedora) basic workstation on your computers. It will be sufficient to meet your needs.



 
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by:mikeleahy
ID: 35188353
which one is more stable in your opinion?
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by:rindi
ID: 35188399
Ubuntu based systems are in my opinion more user-friendly and probably also more stable. Particularly look at the LTS version, (Long Time Support), as those are supported for a longer period than other versions are. The current LTS version is 10.04.

I've had some issues with stability now and then with Fedora, but haven't used for some time now.

OpenSUSE is generally also very stable.
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Author Comment

by:mikeleahy
ID: 35188844
thanks guys. im trying to install evolution on ubuntu but dont see a setup :-) i untarred the file into a folder, any one know how i do it?>
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by:rindi
ID: 35188934
Use synaptic (your package manager) to install evolution. It is included in the Ubuntu repositories, or it should be. There is no need to download and install the source. When you have started synaptic, just enter evolution in the search bar and it should list evolution and it's addons.Then just select whatever you need or want, and then click on "Apply". That will download and install evolution.

Ubuntu has a huge list of apps you can install directly via it's repos that way, that makes the installation of them very easy. You only ever want to install things manually if it isn't available directly from the repo's.

Apart from that, if you use the repo's your' system and all the apps are maintained with updates etc.

That is one of the really big advantages when you use Linux over m$ OS's. In Windoze for instance only windoze gets updated, and maybe some m$ products like Office, everything else you need to update and maintain yourself.
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