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Terminal Server 2003 VM in Hyper-V running CPU at 100%

I had posted this question before, but I excepted the answer to soon. My origanal question was: ( I have a Terminal Server as a VM in Hyper-V. The OS is Server 2003 R2 x64.
It has 14GB of Memory Assigned to it and 4 processors.
The host has 2 Quad core Xeon processors with I believe hyper threading as they both show 8 logical processors.
The host only has only one other VM with 4GB of Memory assigned and one processor.

The processor in the VM keeps running a 100% with only 10 to 12 users logged in.
At the same time its only using a couple of GBs of memory.))

I went into the Properties of the Network card and disabled all Offloads listed, but its now doing the same thing again. I have another host running 6 different VM's setup exactly the same as far as I know and it doesnt have these issues with the VM's. Also with my other host; when in the VM's they dont even list any Offloads...

Do I delete the virtual Network card and create a new one? I'm not sure why one hosts VM's are listing Offload and the other Hosts VM's are not....
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jkellyg78
Asked:
jkellyg78
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1 Solution
 
Cliff GaliherCommented:
A common misunderstanding with virtualization. Because Hyper-V allows you to "overcommit" processors, it has to manage how much processing power it gives a VM. For example, you may have a single processor, quad core physical machine. But you could create 10 VMs and give them each 4 virtual processors. Then the hypervisor has to allocate resources as-needed as it doesn't have enough physical cores to dedicate them to the VMs.

As such, seeing very high CPU usage within a VM is very common. All this means is that the amount of CPU usage that the VM needs is being given, but not more, thus from the VMs standpoint, it is running *at* 100%. If it needed more CPU cycles, the hypervisor would give it any free cycles it could and the VM would suddenly run faster, but still be at 100%. That 100% CPU utilization is *in no way* related to physical CPU usage.

For this reason Hyper-V exposes its own performance counters to the Windows performance monitoring tools. If you set up CPU monitoring within the performance monitoring tool, you can see how much physical CPU time a particular VM is *actually* using and is the only accurate metric to measure such things.

In short, if you have a specific performance issue, troubleshoot it. But if you are concerned just because of anecdotal observations, don't worry about it...it is how Hyper-V (and most hypervisors) work.

-Cliff
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Patrick NunezCommented:
How is the performance for the users?  The they experience any type of latency while working on the terminal server?
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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

This question has been classified as abandoned and is closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See the recommendation for more details.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Given the nature of the question and no follow-up with actual problems or performance issues, I feel my comment ID:35202263 is accurate from the symptom described, is well documented by Microsoft, and would be a helpful answer in the database for future searches for people with similar concerns.

-Cliff
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