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How can I reset disks to Non-RAID without losing my data?

I have a Windows XP Pro SP3 system that's been booting to an RAID-array managed by Intel Matrix Storage Manager.  It's using a RAID-0 stripe.  One of the 2 Maxtor drives used in the array has failed mechanically and system won't boot.  In the Intel Configuration manager I have the option to delete RAID array and convert to non-RAID disks, which is what I need.  But, it states that the procedure will destroy all data on the disk...?  Is this accurate and if so, why?

What procedures do I need to perform to make this happen WITHOUT losing the data and having to reformat the disk, etc.  This is just not an option.  Too many specialized programs and way, way too much time getting everything set just right.

What I want to do is go ahead and perform the "convert to non-RAID disks" function.  Then when it restarts and won't reboot properly...can't I just perform a Windows XP repair operation and do a Fixboot and FixMBR?

Please Help
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TallTech
Asked:
TallTech
1 Solution
 
chrisrbloomCommented:
can you create a system image, copy it over to an external drive...then UN-RAID your disks.

Then using the image, reload it onto one of the RAID member disks.
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Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software EngineerCommented:
You are in a difficult situation.  RAID 0 does not provide for recovery in case of failure, so one disk failing in a RAID 0 set means that half the data should be considered lost.  However, since RAID splits data across disks by blocks and not by files, in fact all the data is corrupt.

The best chance of recovering from this failure is to send both drives off to a professional recovery service that can deal with RAID sets, hope that they can restore the data, and never store anything on a RAID 0 set again.
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chrisrbloomCommented:
Sorry - I didn't see you had a failed disk.

I think you're not going to like the answer, but you're probably not getting the data back.

RAID 0 uses 2 disks as one - so it writes the data across both disks simultaneously (not mirrored, RAID1).

Therefore, if say disk #2 has failed, you essentially have only half of each one of your files still usable. (not precisely, but you get the point)...and you understand that half a file is no file at all.

It's a risk with RAID 0 - All of my company machines are set up that way.  When I build a new system, we always make a disc image, then with User Document Redirection and constant harping, I'm always telling them that putting personal files on a RAID 0 is at thier own risk.

Wish I had a better answer for you.
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cavp76Commented:
It's using a RAID-0 stripe.  One of the 2 Maxtor drives used in the array has failed mechanically and system won't boot.

RAID 0 + disk failure = Good bye data

No way to recover it; sorry pal.
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andyalderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
Disk mechanical failure is normally really electronic failure on the PCB, it is possible to swap the PCB with a similar one, but there's an EEPROM that needs transporting with the disk assembly so be prepared to send it to a specialist repairer.
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MikeIT ProfessionalCommented:
This question has been classified as abandoned and is being closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See my comment at the end of the question for more details.
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