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Does active directory always have to set up a new user account on XP machines?

Posted on 2011-03-23
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I am migrating a novell 5.1 network to Server 2008 R2.  I have the luxury of setting up the new server and testing it, tweaking, without going live until I know everything is working.  I've set up active directory, DNS, etc.  My first XP machine logged into the new server without problem except that it created a new user on the client. (I now have Scott (old user name) and scott.ids (new user name) under documents and settings on my XP machine.  Our machines are 90% XP and a few new computers with Windows 7.  I didn't realize this would be the case, I assumed I could use the employees current user name on their computer.  Is there a way to make this happen?  Otherwise, each machine that connects to the new Domain server has to create a new user account on the clients machine? I would then have to migrate all data from their old user account to the new one?  I have a very simple network.  The server will function as DNS, File Server, and we may at a later date migrate a SQL database to the box.  Is there a setting in Active Directory that allows me to use the current clients user name?
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Question by:SMcDonald666
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7 Comments
 
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by:KCTS
ID: 35199409
Yes - the local account cannot be used on domains - a new domain account is created on the DC, which will have a new profile associated with it on the local machine
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by:jerrypd
ID: 35199425
unfortunately, active directory sees the new user a a totally different user than the one that exists in the computer, therefore it has to create the new user.
i haven't run across any programs (other than the migrate user wizard in SBS world) that does this for you...
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Author Comment

by:SMcDonald666
ID: 35199678
So if I have 10 employees and one day a machine goes down.  I ask employee Alex to use John's machine because he is not in today.  What happens when Alex tries to login to the domain on Alex's computer?  Does he have to know John's password? or can he login as alex?
Thanks,
Scott
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by:KCTS
ID: 35199720
He can log in with his own domain account - domain accounts are held on the DC - not on the local computer
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by:jerrypd
ID: 35199753
what KCTS says is true, but there is a caveat here - Alex is not an administrator to Johns local machine, so there may be issues running certain programs that need local administrator rights.
In addition, a new profile will be created on Johns machine for Alex (unless you have roaming profiles set up).
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by:SMcDonald666
ID: 35199797
Jerrypd:  You hit-on what I was looking for.  We have a conference room computer that we allow anyone to logon to.  I don't want to have 25 users accounts on this machine.  So using a roaming profile allows other users to logon to a domain without creating a new users on the individual machine?
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KCTS earned 500 total points
ID: 35199836
You don't have to create 25 local user accounts !!

The domain user accounts are created on the DC and can be used by any user from any machine.

When a user logs on to a machine for the first time a local profile will be created - but this is NOT creating a new user !!!

Roaming profiles can be useful - but they can slow doen your network - esoecially inf you don't impliment folder redirection.
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