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Wireless Router Seperate Wireless Users Hard Wire Users

I want to get a wireless router but want the wireless users to be on their own network and not able to connect to the hard wire users. What technology will let me accomplish this and what should I look for? Ideally I want a wireless router dsl modem combo so I don't have so many boxes on my desk.
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FASTECHS
Asked:
FASTECHS
6 Solutions
 
SteveCommented:
This depends on how much you want to separate the two sets of users.

To do it properly you'd need a firewall/router which can separate the two networks and specifically control what, if any, traffic flows between them. You'd need a separate adsl modem /firewal to connect and protect both networks from the internet.

As you are looking for an all in one box solution you may struggle. Generally, most ADSL/wireless/router combos have the wireless network on the same side of the firewall/router as the wired network. both are protected from the internet but the router/firewall.

What you appear to want isn't available at user prices and would be an expensive bit of kit.

the link provided above by pcchiu doesn't mention anything about being able to separate the two networks and also isn't an ADSL modem, so doesn't really fit your request.

Could you be more specific on your requirements so we can advise a bit better?

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cripplecaptainCommented:
the above is deffinately a wireless router however I do not know personaly of any home router that does this, I have a watchguard firewall that does this but its rather pricey.
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Aaron TomoskySD-WAN SimplifiedCommented:
Buffalos that come with ddwrt preinstalled do this. Also if you put ddwrt on a compatible router it can do this. The next step up in a router that I know does this is a sonicwall.  I think the easiest and cheapest option is to just buy two routers. Plug the one with wifi on from it's wan to the modem ( I dislike all in ones). Then plug the LAN of that into the wan of the router for hardwired users. The wifi users will not be able to get to the hardwired guys. The hardwired guys can get to the wifi guys If you want.
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FASTECHSAuthor Commented:
If I buy a switch that supports vlan and my modem/router/wifi all in one is plugged into the switch can I isolate the wifi users from the hard wire network users
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SteveCommented:
yes but VLANS would seperate them from the router too, meaning they cannot access the internet unless you but a 2nd router.
As advised above, seperate routers/firewalls would be much easier.

Get a fairly cheap and simple firewall/router for the wired network (router 1) for ethernet connections (EG cable modem, not ADSL)
Get an adsl modem/firewall/router/wireless for the internet and wireless (router 2)

Basically, connect router 2 to the internet (adsl) and set it up as normal. The wireless clients are protected from the internet by the firewall.
Connect the WAN side of router 1 to router 2's internal ports (just like a PC). set the firewall up on router 1 and put the wired clients on it's internal ports.

This means you have:

internet > Firewall (router 2) > wireless clients & Firewall (router 1) > Wired clients

The wireless clients are in a basic DMZ, which means they are on the INSIDE of a firewall protecting them from the internet but on the OUTSIDE of a firewall protecting the wired PCs from the wireless PCs AND the internet.

Very cheap routers would be fine for this and it wouldnt cost much. (Less than £60)

Take a look at fig 2 on this link.
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/techjournal/0907_banerjee/0907_banerjee.html

Your layout wouldbe the same as this but with wireless clients in the DMZ where the 'web server' is shown.
Your wired clients would be where the 'proxy cluster' would be.

This is widely used in many businesses but is easly scaled down for your needs.
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FASTECHSAuthor Commented:
Moderator please close and add points to everyone
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FASTECHSAuthor Commented:
I ended up buying two routers
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