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Changing Domain Controller from Raid1 to Raid5

I currently have a domain controller with 4 drive slots.  Only two are taken up, and configured in a raid1 array.  We are running low on space, so I purchased another drive.  The HP Array Configuration Utility is telling me that it can't add the drive because of the Raid1 configuration, then asks me if I want to reconfigure the drives into Raid5.  My question is, will this cause any loss of data?  Would I have to restore a backup after configuring, or would the data stay intact?
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lflorence
Asked:
lflorence
1 Solution
 
FerrostiCommented:
I do not know about this tool.
In general RAID controllers work on a lower base than file system or similar. So I´d assume that all data will be lost. Another point is, that it is always better to restore from backup in your scenario. Disks tend to fail rather under heavy load than in idle, so a RAID reconfigure is always an issue.
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Chev_PCNCommented:
Some points to consider:
If you destroy your mirror & create a RAID5 array, it WILL destroy all data on the drives. You will have to do a complete backup & restore from an external source.

An easier way to utilise the space and improve performance might be to simply create a second (D:) drive on the new disk, and then move the pagefile and other data there. The one disadvantage is that there will be no redundancy for that drive. It would be best to get another disk & create a second mirror.
This will also entail a lot less downtime on the server.
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andyalderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
You can go ahead and do the RAID 1 to RAID 5 migration, it's not data destructive. All online RAID level migration does is re-stripe the data across all the disks. It's a slow (4GB/hour) process but since it's done online it's zero downtime. You won't be able to stretch C: online though (unless Win2008) although you could create a second logical disk for D: on the array instead.
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