Persistence ignorance?

Please define it if possible is a few sentences. I can not find a link that does it without a very long start to the answer.

I work in the MVC3 ASP.NET 4.0 world.

Thanks,
newbieweb
newbiewebSr. Software EngineerAsked:
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ToddBeaulieuConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I haven't worked with EF, but if you've got the controllers passing EF objects, then it is most certainly NOT persistence ignorant. The controller should not know anything about how data is manipulated. It should call a service, asking for an entity or a collection of entities. The service would then call the correct repository, in the case EF. You might first develop that app with an XML repository and then convert over to an EF repository. If you had coded the EF specific logic into the controllers, then you'd have to rewrite theme ach time you wanted to switch. The mentioned solution would allow you to hand one or the other repository over to the service, asking it to perform the operation. You can also look into "dependency injection", which MVC 3 supports. You tell the service to accept a repository by way of an interface and then configure a special class to return the appropriate repository when it sees any object looking for an IMyRepository.
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jesusafloresCommented:
what the problemA??, i don't understand...
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ToddBeaulieuConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I'm not sure what the context is for your question, but persistence describes how your data is stored. A beginner coder might fetch data directly from the controller with queries that are specific to the storage, whether it's SQL, XML, etc. By using the repository pattern, you'd introduce a persistance specific repository that knows about the data implementation (SQL, XML, etc.) and hide that detail from the calling controller (or better yet, a service that is called by the controller).
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newbiewebSr. Software EngineerAuthor Commented:
I use a Data Dtore around my Entity Framework 4.0 object. I also have my Controller create a new instance on creation then each Controller Action passes that Data Store into each object that's created, and passed in as a parameter to the nth degree, as a parameter in contruction of my classes.

Is this Persistence Ignorance?

I am trying to get my definition of the tem down.

Thanks.
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newbiewebSr. Software EngineerAuthor Commented:
Interesting. I think you're right. I made it persitence aware.

I did this since saving a Project object to a different instance than the one from which is was called created problems.  I actually have a code change that I could keep, even if I were to remove any Controller awareness of the Data Store.

What I do is:
1) Instantiate a Data Store
2) Retrieve a Project from it
3) Set the Data Store property on the Project
4) When I save that Project, it uses the Data Store which spawned it

Is this logical?

Otherwise, EF makes you go throgh hoops to update an existing object.

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ToddBeaulieuConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hmmm . Like I said, I haven't used EF yet, but I'll take a stab.

What's a project in your context? An entity?

I really can't believe EF would want you to return EF specific objects to the controller, embedded in the entities.

I'd expect you to have a service that is handed the entity and asked to save it. The service would then forward the request to the EF repository.

Big guess here .. not sure what the DataStore is, but could it be static, meaning it persists across calls, handling all data operations?
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newbiewebSr. Software EngineerAuthor Commented:
Sorry for the confusion. A Project is just an object based on the project class. Thanks.
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