Dead HD

I tried attaching a 2.5mm Sata drive through a USB connector powered by another PSU and it doesn't appear within OS. any way to bring it up?
meteormanAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
DavidPresidentCommented:
Well the firmware rev certainly can't be guaranteed to be correct.  The only two ways to know if it is correct, outside of a lab, is to either
1. Purchase the disk in a sealed retail package.
2. Programmatically query it.

White market OEM disks, i.e, Dell will have their own part numbers, BTW

But the real issue is if you purchased this retail, from a VAR, or even OEM, then there is possibility that FW was updated.  

The other issue is you have absolutely NO idea if the FW on the board you purchased is correct, unless you are buying a new retail disk!

Also, to be fair, replacing the board is not a high probability, but a reasonable one if your alternative is to throw the disk away ... but don't get your hopes up.  I would look first to see if you have a LOCAL data recovery firm that will give a free estimate.   You might get lucky and it is a board. If so, then realistically it wouldn't cost you $200 more than what you would pay to source the board, so odds aren't really that bad.    

If it is not the board, then you put money in your pocket by not paying for stuff you don't need.

If it is the board, you have the choice of paying a little bit more, but KNOW it will be done right.

So if I was in your shoes, I'd first try to get a "free" diagnosis.


0
 
Brian GeeCommented:
Does your OS indicate a USB device has been connected? If so, can you go to diskmgmt.msc (Start > Run > type in diskmgmt.msc > OK) and see if the drive is being noted here?
0
 
MaximumIQCommented:
First Check if you see it in the BIOS. if you see it in the BIOS then you can check computer management. Right click My Computer => Manage => Disk Management. If you see it there and not in My computer then you probably just have to assign it a drive letter.

If you dont even see it in the BIOS at all, try different power and sata cords or try it in a different computer.
0
WEBINAR: 10 Easy Ways to Lose a Password

Join us on June 27th at 8 am PDT to learn about the methods that hackers use to lift real, working credentials from even the most security-savvy employees. We'll cover the importance of multi-factor authentication and how these solutions can better protect your business!

 
stevepcguyCommented:
Couple questions:
What's the OS you are using?
Can you feel the drive spinning? You may need to pick it up to verify.

If you've got no spin, then it's all the way dead. If it's mostly dead, then that means partly alive. If it's all the way dead, then all you can do is use it as a coaster.
0
 
meteormanAuthor Commented:
It spins but does not appear in disk management. I tried it attached in a machine using Sata cables  and   using USB without any luck. I'd hate to give up on it.
0
 
DavidPresidentCommented:
Not all usb bridge chips support all versions of SATA. If the HDD does SATA-2 only, but bridge chip does SATA1 only, then unless there is a jumper to set the disk to SATA1 speed then you are going to have to get a different enclosure.

As USB is going to be the bottleneck anyway, then most no-name USB enclosures won't bother supporting SATA2.  So read the specs if any exist.
0
 
meteormanAuthor Commented:
Initially I attached the hard drive using a sata connecter within a desktop and booted an OS of a cd to see of I could see it and that did not work. It's a standard Hitachi sata drive out of a lap top.
0
 
DavidPresidentCommented:
Then it is really simple.  If it does not see it, and you certainly tried multiple power and data interfaces & controllers, then your  ONLY choice is a recovery lab.  

Then give up and call in a pro.

Those software packages that do limited recovery won't see the disk if the BIOS doesn't.   Some recovery firms give free estimates, but figure on average of $500, and certainly nothing less than $300.
0
 
meteormanAuthor Commented:
I would have to spend $7000 mim. for a the recovery unit to call myself a pro. Price off a computer in the 80s.
0
 
nobusbiljart fanCommented:
if you want -  you can replace the logic card of the disk - if you find the same model and firmware level :  http://www.deadharddrive.com/      
0
 
DavidPresidentCommented:
I object to closing for zero.  The question was answered in #35246365 after author confirmed his testing included swapping the only other variables.  The disk is dead and can't be repaired except by a professional lab, as acknowledged by author in #35248043

The author asked if there was any way to bring it up, he acknowledged and and agreed that it would take a professional recovery lab.  One can't just erase the question if you don't like the answer.
0
 
nobusbiljart fanCommented:
i even posted an alternative solution
0
 
stevepcguyCommented:
I agree with dlethe and nobus. Sometimes correct answers aren't what you want to hear, but they are nonetheless the best answer available. Please acknowledge their efforts and obvious expertise, and the fact that they are doing this gratis. Do the right thing, and give them some credit.
0
 
DavidPresidentCommented:
yes absolutely, split with nobus.  
0
 
meteormanAuthor Commented:
The logic board option  is worth a try. It looks like I'll have to find an exact match. The Drives don't specify firmware
0
 
nobusbiljart fanCommented:
here a site with logic boards :  http://www.onepcbsolution.com/
0
 
nobusbiljart fanCommented:
>>  The Drives don't specify firmware    <<  wrong - it is always printed on it, but not always saying firmware - if in doubt, post the label of your disk
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.