Page File Size Issues- Server 2008

I have bumped up the page file to the recommended 1.5 x RAM and whenever I reboot the machine. I have it set at 9216MB(I have 6 GB of RAM installed). It is not being added though. When I look at the physical memory I still only get 6GB of the page file. I have programs maxing it out and it eventually ends up runningat 90%+ physical memory usage. Is there something I'm setting wrong to where I'm not getting the extra space added? I am running SQL 2005 database on here and that is taking up half of the physical memory at some points.
FIFBAAsked:
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Rodney BarnhardtServer AdministratorCommented:
We have started limiting the amount of memory SQL can use, which has really cut down on performance issues. SQL tends to creepup and use as much memory as it can gain. This may help in your situation.

http://www.eraofdata.com/blog/sql-server-memory-configuration/
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prerakgCommented:
How muc hfree space is avaialable on the drive that contains your page file. You can try moving the page file to a different location or partition thats got some extra free space to alloacte the page file size of your choice or you can set multiple page files on differnt partitions in case you want more out of it..
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Darius GhassemCommented:
I would allow Windows to manage by page file this allows windows to dynamically manage the page file
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
>>I am running SQL 2005 database on here and that is taking up half of the physical memory at some points. <<
I am not exactly sure what is the problem.  SQL Server by design will try and use all the memory it can.  That is why it is very important to follow the recommendations and install MS SQL Server standalone.  If you chose not to do so and are sharing it with (God forbid) something like IIS, than you will have to cripple it by setting the max memory it can use.
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FIFBAAuthor Commented:
I have plenty of hard drive space and it says it is allocated. It still only has 6GB as the physical memory though. I never see any gains from increasing the page file. I could do that, but I'm worried about causing more performance issues by messing with SQL settings and I'm not a SQL guru.
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
So why do you think that your "performance issues" are direct result of SQL Server using "90%+ physical memory"?

Let me suggest that you may actually have other problems as simple as badly performing queries that are hogging all the resources (and by this I don't mean memory by I/O and CPU).
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Rodney BarnhardtServer AdministratorCommented:
Why not set up perfmon and capture memory, disk I\O, etc? Some of the major, potential bottlenecks. This will tell you for certain where your problem exist. However, SQL will use as much memory as it can get if you do not throttle it.
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FIFBAAuthor Commented:
We are using terminal servers to connect to the 2008 Server and run a sql application. The thin clients keep locking up even when the server doesn't. The only thing that is obvious is that the physical memory is running at 90+%. We've tried new switches and new terminals and still get the same results. However, a pc with RDP doesn't disconnect and can continue working when the thin clients lock up. I'm extremely stumped as to where to go from here.
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FIFBAAuthor Commented:
I'm sorry for the late replies. If you are still willing to help me I will reply much faster and work towards a solution.
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
So set the max memory SQL Server can use.  It will cripple SQL Server, but at least this way you will confirm that it is not the problem.
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FIFBAAuthor Commented:
I have 6GB of ram and use SQL 2005 64 bit. How much memory should I start at? I found an article saying 4800, but I was wondering if I should go lower? If it uses that much memory it could still be hitting the 90% memory usage with other processes running.
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
I really do not have much experience with that, so I really could not say, but 4800 sounds about right.  After you restart SQL Server you should see memory usage creep up until it gets to 4800.
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Rodney BarnhardtServer AdministratorCommented:
If you check out my post to this question on 3/30, there is a link on setting SQL's memory usage. I suggested you set the memory it could use then.
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FIFBAAuthor Commented:
I've taken this up with Microsoft at this point. I will post as to the resolution once I get the case closed. I accepted this solutions because it did show me how to set the SQL memory.
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