What Style to Use to Replace <cite>

I was looking at HTML <em> <strong> <dfn> <code> <samp> <kbd> <var> <cite> Tags and it said:

The <em>, <strong>, <dfn>, <code>, <samp>, <kbd>, <var>, and <cite> tags are all phrase tags. They are not deprecated, but it is possible to achieve richer effect with CSS.

But I did not find the proper style to be used.  Can anyone help and let me know what I should use?

Thank you!
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coreybryantAsked:
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Gurvinder Pal SinghCommented:
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David S.Commented:
The phrase elements do have purposes. Read the real specs to see what they are: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/text.html#h-9.2.1

You can style them however you want. <strong> is typically bold by default, some of the others are typically italic by default, and the others typically use a fixed-width font by default.

If you would like more specific help, please provide more detail about what you want to do.


P.S.  I recommend that everyone reads this: W3Fools: A W3Schools Intervention
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coreybryantAuthor Commented:
Well I do understand <cite> but from reading the link, it made me think that <cite> was on its way out (like <center>, <dir>, <strike>, <font>, etc.  

If <cite> is still a valid tag (for reference) and should be around for awhile, I'll be more than happy to use it.  I basically just wanted to make sure that I should use <cite>.  I know no one can predict what might happen in the next 5 - 10 years with the code, but I just did not want to use <cite> today and then learn next month that I should use something else (for a reference).
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Gurvinder Pal SinghCommented:
but why do you have to use cite tag if you can achieve the same using font-style: italic ?
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I read "W3Fools: A W3Schools Intervention" and while they have some good points, it is still a whine.  W3Schools for all their flaws is doing much more good as a resource than the whiners are.  Besides, there are some very competent people who don't agree with them about a lot of things.

As for "<em>, <strong>, <dfn>, <code>, <samp>, <kbd>, <var>, and <cite> tags", you should realize that they are styled in the browser's built-in style sheet.  Just like 'h1/2/3/4/5/6' are frequently redefined in the style sheet for a page, you might want to define a specific style for these tags when you use them.  If Eric Meyer's CSS Reset is being used, you will have to set specific style because it 'resets' all of them.  http://meyerweb.com/eric/tools/css/reset/
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coreybryantAuthor Commented:
After reading the responses, I might have misunderstood the meaning for <cite>.  I added some text between the tags to see what it shows.

My "goal" was to basically cite a page from someone else, not necessarily have the text appear in italics.  

Since I read that information on W3 schools, I took it to mean there was another tag to use.  For example, some of the "newer" tags like <nav>, <header>, <footer>.  

So I guess - is this <cite> tag still the correct way to cite an author / publication, etc?
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David S.Commented:
> So I guess - is this <cite> tag still the correct way to cite an author / publication, etc?

Yes.


> If <cite> is still a valid tag (for reference) and should be around for awhile, I'll be more than happy to use it.

Those elements, including <cite>, are included in (the working draft of) HTML 5, so they'll still be around for a long time to come.


>  Besides, there are some very competent people who don't agree with them about a lot of things.

I don't agree with them on every point, but W3Fools is useful for showing that w3schools.com is filled with a lot of outdated, inaccurate, and/or misleading information, so W3Schools is often not the best reference.
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coreybryantAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the information.  I'll stick to w3schools and www.w3.org - I cannot bring myself to ever go to any site for expert advice / knowledge with the word "fool" in it, no matter who is the author or if the site is respected amongst others unfortunately.
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