Run two LAN cables in single channel?

I am not sure how to explain this. Basically, there are these plastic channels (with a cover) fixed on walls in which you put a wire/cable when you are running a network cable through the house so that the wiring is concealed and doesn't look ugly.

Now, is it okay to put two LAN cables into one plastic channel? Will the network throughput be affected? The LAN cables themselves will be touching each other within the channel. The cables are labelled as CAT5E PATCH CABLES. Each is about 10 mts. long.

Thanks in advance.

Ramdak
scmeevenAsked:
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LlanoVCommented:
No problem at all!

Go for it...
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BasheerptCommented:
multiple network cables together is fine, no problem. They should not bend in 90 degrees.
Network cable and electric cables should not go together. it will interfere and affect performance.

Regards
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scmeevenAuthor Commented:
LlanoV, thanks for the confirmation. I asked because I read somewhere that having two cables together could mean their signals interfering with each other and reducing network throughput.

What are your thoughts about adding a telephone cable to the mix? Will that interfere with the LAN cable signals or vice-versa?
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scmeevenAuthor Commented:
Basheerpt, I am afraid I may have to bend them a bit. The cables need to run along the wall in order to reach the place where we set up the computers and there are bends that we cannot avoid, unfortunately.

Still worth trying?
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BasheerptCommented:
Practically we run network and telephone cables (cat3) together in plastic channel and no visible impacts are found in the performance. I think you can safely go with it. If you have too much cable of that kind, sepaating is advised.
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LlanoVCommented:
The article you are refering most probably refers to mixing of power and IP cabling. Ths is not a good idea and the power cables will induce harmonics into the data cables.

I have mixed voice and data in the same tray on a number of occasions without any problems

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BasheerptCommented:
90 degrees bend i meant L shaped sharp bending, which is to be avoided, instead you can make it as a curve. Eventhough you have bended it in L shape, in normal lan environment you will not see much od reduction. you may go ahead with trial.
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LlanoVCommented:
Example of "L" bend in UTP cable
Maybe this will help to explain the "L" bend
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scmeevenAuthor Commented:
Basheerpt, thanks for the clarifications. LlanoV, that diagram is super helpful, thanks!
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BasheerptCommented:
Glad those helped...happy cabling..:)
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LlanoVCommented:
Glad to be of help!
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