Outlook - reply all - modification

I want to disable the Reply All function in Outlook 2007/2010 running against an Exchange 2003 server.  In place of it I want to create two buttons - Reply-to-all-internal and a Reply-to-all-internal-and-external. If a user received an e-mail with various to's and cc's that included some internal e-mail domain users and others external and  they wanted to reply only to the internal users on the original e-mail they would choose the 'Reply-to-all-internal' button.  If they actually wanted to reply to all in the original e-mail they received  - regardless if they were internal and external correspondents - they would choose the 'Reply-to-all-internal-and-external ' button. How would I go about doing this? I am open to third-party applications, VB code, macros, etc.
lineonecorpAsked:
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Charltp5Commented:
I'm unable to submit any code for this at this time but you'll need to remove the existing Reply All button from the email toolbar and I'd suggest adding a drop down menu item with two options for internal only and reply all.

The macros are quite simple and I'm sure others will post answers before I get back to my PC (on iPad now).

Set a constant for you domain name and remove all non-matching addresses in To, Cc and BCc fields.
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lineonecorpAuthor Commented:
Thanks for saying it's doable and we can definitely do the removing the existing button and creating the drop down menu.  It's the actual macro/code - the one that strips all the non-internal addresses out of the reply - that we need help on.
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David LeeCommented:
Just a quick comment guys.  Since this is Outlook 2007/2010 there won't be a toolbar in all instances.  Outlook 2007 has toolbars for the main interface and the ribbon for messages.  Outlook 2010 only has the ribbon.  I don't believe a macro can add buttons to it.  I believe that requires an add-in.  Individual users can add a QAT button, but I believe that's a manual process.  There's also more than one way to reply all (e.g. the context menus have that option too), so to be effective the solution will have to disable all possible means of replying all.  The best solution may be to disable the ability to reply all with the code matthewspatrick provided in another of lineonecorps questions.  
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Patrick MatthewsCommented:
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David LeeCommented:
Yes, that's the one.  Disabling the actions disables them everywhere at once.  It's a much better solution than trying to disable the menu selections, toolbar/ribbon buttons, context menus, etc.
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lineonecorpAuthor Commented:
In case you're wondering why I'm posting separate questions on what might seem like the same topic the reason is that I have been advised in the past by the moderators that it's better for Experts point accumulation to ask more questions than less - in other words prevent scope creep where the Expert keeps being asked one more question on the same thread but for the same number of points. With programming this can obviously be a big problem.  As I am envisaging all kinds of different ways of carrying this out, I am trying to break the different ways into different questions as opposed to a long ongoing question. Hope that clarifies my motives.

As far as the point you raise about the ribbon/toolbar differences in 2007/2010 how do you suggest dealing with that?  It seems that once I have the relevant code be it add-in or macro the issue will be deployment - which is another question altogether that I have posted about. So at this point what I am in need of is the code for the buttons in question whether they be add-in or macro. Can any of you provide me with that?
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David LeeCommented:
There are a couple of ways to go at this.

1.  Use policies to disable Reply and Reply All.  I'm not deep into policies so I don't know if you can disable all the necessary menus and buttons that way.  If it is possible, then all that's left is adding the buttons for the two types of replies you want to offer.  You have two choices on how to do that.

    a.  Write an addin.  Add-ins are more complicated to write than macros.  They are not a simple undertaking.  Writing an addin is really beyond the scope of what EE is for: answering questions.  Addins are easy to distribute and can be installed using available tools.

    b.  Use a macro and QAT buttons.  Macros are relatively simple to write.  But there's no automated installation or distribution mechanism.  The closest you can come is to flatly overwrite Outlook's code file.  That will effectively install a macro, but will also destroy any existing macros in the process.  That's not a problem if the target audience doesn't have any macros, but it won't work well if any of them do.  The macro would then have to be tied to a QAT button.  The QAT (quick access toolbar) is the area just above the ribbon.  You can add buttons there including ones that run macros.  Outlook's object model doesn't expose the QAT to macros.  You'd either have to add the buttons manually (i.e. a trip to each computer) or you could try setting the buttons up on one computer and copying the QAT files to the other computers.  I've not done that before, but it should work.  However, as with Outlook's code file, copying a QAT file to another computer means overwriting the existing QAT file which would lose any changes the user made.

2.  Take matthewspatrick's approach and use code to disable the commands (which is different than disabling the menus items/buttons that run the command).  But, this has problems of its own.  The commands are disabled on a per item basis so the code has to keep track of what item is currently being looked at in order to disable the commands on that item.  That would be simple if Outlook only allowed you to open/select one item at a time, but Outlook allows for any number of items to be open.  That means even more code to keep track of all the open items.  You'd still have to deal with adding buttons to the ribbon or creating QAT buttons so the rest of what I said above applies here too.

The best solution is to create an add-in.  I doubt that anyone here is going to volunteer to spend the time required to build a professional add-in.  There are places like Rent-A-Coder where you can hire someone to do that.  Of course that won't be free.  I'm just guessing, but I expect that a well written addin will run between $250 and $500.  

The real problem here is the ribbon.  If Outlook still used toolbars, then this could all be done with macros.  You'd simply have to distribute the code file to all computers.  
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lineonecorpAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the thorough writeup. I will chew over the options.
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David LeeCommented:
You're welcome.
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