Cannot install XP on a new machine that had Windows 7 on it

I am trying to install XP on a brand new Dell PC that has Windows 7 home prem on it. I am using a Dell XP home disc with SP3 to format and install XP on the machine. It gets to the last blue screen where is says windows setup is starting and then it just goes to a BSOD. the error code is 0x0000007b
I had a dell laptop the other day that did the same thing after installing a brand new harddrive. I tired an XP pro disc and XP finally installed so I tried the XP Pro disc on this computer and still the same BSOD.
It is a brand new PC and ran the Dell diag and everything checks out. Is there a trick to install XP on newer systems or Dell systems?
calitechAsked:
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Hutch_77Commented:
It is most likely due to a chipset that XP SP3 cannot handle.  You can try and slipstream the drivers in using nLite and build a new installation, but I can almost guarantee that is the issue.  And you may have serious issues just finding drivers for XP for the machines.
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CrowaXCommented:
This may be a bit of a stretch, but try deleting all the partitions and creating a new one, then format the new one. Windows 7 creates a boot partition that could be messing with something.
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CrowaXCommented:
Hutch may be right also, I missed the fact it was a brand new one. Can you provide the model number?
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Jackie ManCommented:
You may need to enter BIOS to disable Native SATA mode.

Besides, do you remove all partitions (including the 100mb OEM reserved partition and the hidden recovery partition) during the pre-window stage of your XP setup?
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hunartCommented:
Do you know if the hardware on the PC is compatible with Windows XP.  That could be your problem.  Check with the PC's manufacturer for this info.

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JVFLY23Commented:
You need to format the HD. You should be able to use the windows 7 disc instead to format. I think XP cd will not let you. So dont install with Win. 7, just format. then use xp cd to install
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ChickensaurCommented:
Have you tried booting the system into safe mode for giggles?

To my knowledge, that error means Windows can't find a boot device.  One issue may be the driver it is using for the hard drive controller.  You know when it first is starting up and you get the hit F6 to install drivers?  I'm curious if you found the correct drivers and used them, if the problem would go away.  I haven't seen it before but I wonder if Windows believes it sees the drive when you first go through the startup process, but then fails with the actual OS.

The other thing that I can think of is that inside the BIOS, the controller on newer machines are set to AHCI.  Go into the BIOS and change that setting to something else, let's say IDE or Compatible mode.  Try changing that setting and rebooting, see if Windows starts.
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PowerEdgeTechIT ConsultantCommented:
You need the driver for the storage controller, as XP cannot see SATA drives.

What model are you working with?
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calitechAuthor Commented:
Vostro 460 is the computer model. I just created a recovery set of discs and now I will try to format in another computer and then check the bios settings.
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PowerEdgeTechIT ConsultantCommented:
As jackie said ... you may be able to boot to the BIOS Setup (F2) and set SATA to IDE/ATA/Compatibility Mode ... BUT only use this as a workaround to get the OS installed.  There will be more work ahead of you once you get it installed ... you'll need to load the correct driver.  To me ... it is easier to use it to start with.
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Hutch_77Commented:
It is SandyBridge Chipset.  H67 i isn't going to be XP compliant which is your biggest problem.  THe BSOD is very possibly  the AHCI setting, but you may not be able to change it as this was designed for Vista/7 and Dell only sells it as 7
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aleghartCommented:
Doesn't that Vostro 460 have Sandy Bridge?  You'd need to slipstream drivers and create your own installation CD.

Or, put Win7 back in place and install XP Mode.  It's free and works very well.  I use it for running older apps that won't work in 64-bit (written in the days of W2K), and for printers that have kernel mode drivers.

Plus, you don't have to give up all the RAM that would be wasted over 3.5GB.
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PowerEdgeTechIT ConsultantCommented:
Use the drivers in here to load on a floppy (or use nLiteOS.com to integrate the driver files for SATA/AHCI):
http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Detail_Desc.aspx?agr=Y&DwnldID=19607&ProdId=3301&lang=eng#help
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PowerEdgeTechIT ConsultantCommented:
XP Mode in Windows 7 would be a great option for MOST things (and would probably be much easier than the task ahead of you of trying to install XP - the storage drivers in my link should work, but there may be hardware that is just plain incompatible with no way around it), however, it will cost you $70-90 to upgrade to W7 Pro.
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aleghartCommented:
^ sorry, didn't see the "home" in the O.P.  But a Dell XP Home disc wouldn't be for this computer...thus would be an illegal use of OEM software.  Going with legitimate Win7(pro/ult)+XP Mode may cheaper than buying a legal copy of XP.
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calitechAuthor Commented:
the biggest issue is I can't connect to a windows 2000 server. the server is in a workgroup and not a domain. the other XP machines can connect fine. I have turned on network discovery, file sharing, turned off password sharing, I have a user created in the system with a password that is the same as I added to the server un the computer management under local users and groups.
When I click on the server name it wants a username and password. I tried just the username and password, tired workgroup\username tried servername\user and no luck.
So I was hoping to just get XP on so it is the same for everyone.
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PowerEdgeTechIT ConsultantCommented:
I also missed the "Dell XP CD" part ... you need to forget about your plan, as this cannot be done.  You'll need to 1. live with Windows 7, 2. install Windows 7, upgrade to Pro, and install XP Mode, or 3. purchase a Retail version of XP to install on it.

I think XP Mode sounds like your best option ... you can have XP running all the time within Windows 7 and connected to the Workgroup.  However, like has been said, you need to upgrade to Pro to do this.
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Hutch_77Commented:
one other option is you could install a flavor of linux and use virtualbox for your XP machine and just use virtual box inside of linux...

can technically do the same with 7 home is install virtual box or VMWares desktop software and run virtual XP in it.

But you are still looking at a license for XP you probably won't be able to purchase.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
There IS an Intel driver for the H67 chipset that supports XP (v9.2.0.1009) ... the trick is to get that embedded in your installation media.

You should be able to slipstream that driver in an XP install disc, and then use the slipstreamed media to do the install.    nLite is a relatively simple way to do it.
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Jackie ManCommented:
the biggest issue is I can't connect to a windows 2000 server. the server is in a workgroup and not a domain. the other XP machines can connect fine. I have turned on network discovery, file sharing, turned off password sharing, I have a user created in the system with a password that is the same as I added to the server un the computer management under local users and groups.

If you only have encountered the issue above, there is no need to revert to xp.

Goto local security policy in your win 7 and under security option, there is an option for authenication which could be changed in order to connect to old systems like windows 2000.

Do you want to proceed with this question or start a new question to discuss about local security policy of windows 7?
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Jackie ManCommented:
Open Local Security Policy with elevated administrator privilege. Under Local Policies, goto Security Options and look for "Network security: LAN Manager authentication level" and change the Security Setting to "Send LM & NTLM responses".

Description of this local policy is as follows:-

Network security: LAN Manager authentication level

This security setting determines which challenge/response authentication protocol is used for network logons. This choice affects the level of authentication protocol used by clients, the level of session security negotiated, and the level of authentication accepted by servers as follows:

Send LM & NTLM responses: Clients use LM and NTLM authentication and never use NTLMv2 session security; domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

Send LM & NTLM - use NTLMv2 session security if negotiated: Clients use LM and NTLM authentication and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

Send NTLM response only: Clients use NTLM authentication only and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

Send NTLMv2 response only: Clients use NTLMv2 authentication only and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

Send NTLMv2 response only\refuse LM: Clients use NTLMv2 authentication only and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers refuse LM (accept only NTLM and NTLMv2 authentication).

Send NTLMv2 response only\refuse LM & NTLM: Clients use NTLMv2 authentication only and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers refuse LM and NTLM (accept only NTLMv2 authentication).

Important

This setting can affect the ability of computers running Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows XP Professional, and the Windows Server 2003 family to communicate with computers running Windows NT 4.0 and earlier over the network. For example, at the time of this writing, computers running Windows NT 4.0 SP4 and earlier did not support NTLMv2. Computers running Windows 95 and Windows 98 did not support NTLM.

Default:

Windows 2000 and windows XP: send LM & NTLM responses

Windows Server 2003: Send NTLM response only

Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2: Send NTLMv2 response only

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calitechAuthor Commented:
That was the trick. Thanks to everyone that gave some input. I had XP mode ready as a backup plan.
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