Parsing Facebook Like Number as a variable in ASP VB

Hi guys and girls - I have a job on at the moment where a website users can earn "points" towards a total (its a group total for everyone using the site) by entering a competition ( a simple form with DB Record Insertion), but can also earn points by "liking the site on facebook).

Obviously I can pull a record count out of my DB to access the number of points the "site" has earned from competition entries - but I also need to be able to somehow parse a variable (that of total number of likes) into an ASP VBScript script/page so that I can add them both together to give a total number of points....

I'm a bit new to the FB thing - so am at a loss - any advice will be greatly recieved.

Many thx
BenjyAdamsAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

 
rejoinderCommented:
Before giving this code a try, first you need to see if data is being tracked for the site or individual pages.  Can you plug this into your browser...
https://graph.facebook.com/http://www.you-web-site-here.com/somepagethatisliked
where "www.you-web-site-here.com/somepagethatisliked" will be the website & page in question.
You should get back something like this...
{
   "id": "http://www.you-web-site-here.com/somepagethatisliked",
   "shares": 3342,
   "comments": 34
}
If you see shares, you are good to go and can use the script below.  If that line does not exist, then this might not work for you.  I'm not familiar with Facebook or the reporting tools they provide.  I just did a quick check and found the https://graph.facebook.com site which on the surface looks like it returns the data you want.  I could be wrong but at least you have something to work with.

Edit line 341 to match the website & page you want to return data for.
<script language="JScript" runat="server">
//jscript is from https://github.com/douglascrockford/JSON-js/blob/master/json2.js
var JSON;
if (!JSON) {
    JSON = {};
}

(function () {
    "use strict";

    function f(n) {
        // Format integers to have at least two digits.
        return n < 10 ? '0' + n : n;
    }

    if (typeof Date.prototype.toJSON !== 'function') {

        Date.prototype.toJSON = function (key) {

            return isFinite(this.valueOf()) ?
                this.getUTCFullYear() + '-' +
                f(this.getUTCMonth() + 1) + '-' +
                f(this.getUTCDate()) + 'T' +
                f(this.getUTCHours()) + ':' +
                f(this.getUTCMinutes()) + ':' +
                f(this.getUTCSeconds()) + 'Z' : null;
        };

        String.prototype.toJSON =
            Number.prototype.toJSON =
            Boolean.prototype.toJSON = function (key) {
                return this.valueOf();
            };
    }

    var cx = /[\u0000\u00ad\u0600-\u0604\u070f\u17b4\u17b5\u200c-\u200f\u2028-\u202f\u2060-\u206f\ufeff\ufff0-\uffff]/g,
        escapable = /[\\\"\x00-\x1f\x7f-\x9f\u00ad\u0600-\u0604\u070f\u17b4\u17b5\u200c-\u200f\u2028-\u202f\u2060-\u206f\ufeff\ufff0-\uffff]/g,
        gap,
        indent,
        meta = { // table of character substitutions
            '\b': '\\b',
            '\t': '\\t',
            '\n': '\\n',
            '\f': '\\f',
            '\r': '\\r',
            '"' : '\\"',
            '\\': '\\\\'
        },
        rep;


    function quote(string) {

// If the string contains no control characters, no quote characters, and no
// backslash characters, then we can safely slap some quotes around it.
// Otherwise we must also replace the offending characters with safe escape
// sequences.

        escapable.lastIndex = 0;
        return escapable.test(string) ? '"' + string.replace(escapable, function (a) {
            var c = meta[a];
            return typeof c === 'string' ? c :
                '\\u' + ('0000' + a.charCodeAt(0).toString(16)).slice(-4);
        }) + '"' : '"' + string + '"';
    }


    function str(key, holder) {

// Produce a string from holder[key].

        var i, // The loop counter.
            k, // The member key.
            v, // The member value.
            length,
            mind = gap,
            partial,
            value = holder[key];

// If the value has a toJSON method, call it to obtain a replacement value.

        if (value && typeof value === 'object' &&
                typeof value.toJSON === 'function') {
            value = value.toJSON(key);
        }

// If we were called with a replacer function, then call the replacer to
// obtain a replacement value.

        if (typeof rep === 'function') {
            value = rep.call(holder, key, value);
        }

// What happens next depends on the value's type.

        switch (typeof value) {
        case 'string':
            return quote(value);

        case 'number':

// JSON numbers must be finite. Encode non-finite numbers as null.

            return isFinite(value) ? String(value) : 'null';

        case 'boolean':
        case 'null':

// If the value is a boolean or null, convert it to a string. Note:
// typeof null does not produce 'null'. The case is included here in
// the remote chance that this gets fixed someday.

            return String(value);

// If the type is 'object', we might be dealing with an object or an array or
// null.

        case 'object':

// Due to a specification blunder in ECMAScript, typeof null is 'object',
// so watch out for that case.

            if (!value) {
                return 'null';
            }

// Make an array to hold the partial results of stringifying this object value.

            gap += indent;
            partial = [];

// Is the value an array?

            if (Object.prototype.toString.apply(value) === '[object Array]') {

// The value is an array. Stringify every element. Use null as a placeholder
// for non-JSON values.

                length = value.length;
                for (i = 0; i < length; i += 1) {
                    partial[i] = str(i, value) || 'null';
                }

// Join all of the elements together, separated with commas, and wrap them in
// brackets.

                v = partial.length === 0 ? '[]' : gap ?
                    '[\n' + gap + partial.join(',\n' + gap) + '\n' + mind + ']' :
                    '[' + partial.join(',') + ']';
                gap = mind;
                return v;
            }

// If the replacer is an array, use it to select the members to be stringified.

            if (rep && typeof rep === 'object') {
                length = rep.length;
                for (i = 0; i < length; i += 1) {
                    if (typeof rep[i] === 'string') {
                        k = rep[i];
                        v = str(k, value);
                        if (v) {
                            partial.push(quote(k) + (gap ? ': ' : ':') + v);
                        }
                    }
                }
            } else {

// Otherwise, iterate through all of the keys in the object.

                for (k in value) {
                    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(value, k)) {
                        v = str(k, value);
                        if (v) {
                            partial.push(quote(k) + (gap ? ': ' : ':') + v);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

// Join all of the member texts together, separated with commas,
// and wrap them in braces.

            v = partial.length === 0 ? '{}' : gap ?
                '{\n' + gap + partial.join(',\n' + gap) + '\n' + mind + '}' :
                '{' + partial.join(',') + '}';
            gap = mind;
            return v;
        }
    }

// If the JSON object does not yet have a stringify method, give it one.

    if (typeof JSON.stringify !== 'function') {
        JSON.stringify = function (value, replacer, space) {

// The stringify method takes a value and an optional replacer, and an optional
// space parameter, and returns a JSON text. The replacer can be a function
// that can replace values, or an array of strings that will select the keys.
// A default replacer method can be provided. Use of the space parameter can
// produce text that is more easily readable.

            var i;
            gap = '';
            indent = '';

// If the space parameter is a number, make an indent string containing that
// many spaces.

            if (typeof space === 'number') {
                for (i = 0; i < space; i += 1) {
                    indent += ' ';
                }

// If the space parameter is a string, it will be used as the indent string.

            } else if (typeof space === 'string') {
                indent = space;
            }

// If there is a replacer, it must be a function or an array.
// Otherwise, throw an error.

            rep = replacer;
            if (replacer && typeof replacer !== 'function' &&
                    (typeof replacer !== 'object' ||
                    typeof replacer.length !== 'number')) {
                throw new Error('JSON.stringify');
            }

// Make a fake root object containing our value under the key of ''.
// Return the result of stringifying the value.

            return str('', {'': value});
        };
    }


// If the JSON object does not yet have a parse method, give it one.

    if (typeof JSON.parse !== 'function') {
        JSON.parse = function (text, reviver) {

// The parse method takes a text and an optional reviver function, and returns
// a JavaScript value if the text is a valid JSON text.

            var j;

            function walk(holder, key) {

// The walk method is used to recursively walk the resulting structure so
// that modifications can be made.

                var k, v, value = holder[key];
                if (value && typeof value === 'object') {
                    for (k in value) {
                        if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(value, k)) {
                            v = walk(value, k);
                            if (v !== undefined) {
                                value[k] = v;
                            } else {
                                delete value[k];
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
                return reviver.call(holder, key, value);
            }


// Parsing happens in four stages. In the first stage, we replace certain
// Unicode characters with escape sequences. JavaScript handles many characters
// incorrectly, either silently deleting them, or treating them as line endings.

            text = String(text);
            cx.lastIndex = 0;
            if (cx.test(text)) {
                text = text.replace(cx, function (a) {
                    return '\\u' +
                        ('0000' + a.charCodeAt(0).toString(16)).slice(-4);
                });
            }

// In the second stage, we run the text against regular expressions that look
// for non-JSON patterns. We are especially concerned with '()' and 'new'
// because they can cause invocation, and '=' because it can cause mutation.
// But just to be safe, we want to reject all unexpected forms.

// We split the second stage into 4 regexp operations in order to work around
// crippling inefficiencies in IE's and Safari's regexp engines. First we
// replace the JSON backslash pairs with '@' (a non-JSON character). Second, we
// replace all simple value tokens with ']' characters. Third, we delete all
// open brackets that follow a colon or comma or that begin the text. Finally,
// we look to see that the remaining characters are only whitespace or ']' or
// ',' or ':' or '{' or '}'. If that is so, then the text is safe for eval.

            if (/^[\],:{}\s]*$/
                    .test(text.replace(/\\(?:["\\\/bfnrt]|u[0-9a-fA-F]{4})/g, '@')
                        .replace(/"[^"\\\n\r]*"|true|false|null|-?\d+(?:\.\d*)?(?:[eE][+\-]?\d+)?/g, ']')
                        .replace(/(?:^|:|,)(?:\s*\[)+/g, ''))) {

// In the third stage we use the eval function to compile the text into a
// JavaScript structure. The '{' operator is subject to a syntactic ambiguity
// in JavaScript: it can begin a block or an object literal. We wrap the text
// in parens to eliminate the ambiguity.

                j = eval('(' + text + ')');

// In the optional fourth stage, we recursively walk the new structure, passing
// each name/value pair to a reviver function for possible transformation.

                return typeof reviver === 'function' ?
                    walk({'': j}, '') : j;
            }

// If the text is not JSON parseable, then a SyntaxError is thrown.

            throw new SyntaxError('JSON.parse');
        };
    }
}());
</script>

<%
Function OpenURL(URLtoOpen)
    Dim intStatus, objHTTP
    Set objHTTP = CreateObject( "WinHttp.WinHttpRequest.5.1" )
    objHTTP.Open "GET", URLtoOpen, False
    objHTTP.SetRequestHeader "User-Agent", "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MyApp 1.0; Windows NT 5.1)"
    On Error Resume Next
    objHTTP.Send
    intStatus = objHTTP.Status
    On Error Goto 0
    n = 1
    If intStatus = 200 Then
        OpenURL = objHTTP.ResponseText
    End If
    Set objHTTP = Nothing
End Function

strFacebookData = OpenURL("https://graph.facebook.com/http://www.you-web-site-here.com/somepagethatisliked")

Set myJSON = JSON.parse(strFacebookData)

response.write (myJSON.shares)
%>

Open in new window

0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by ConnectWise

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.