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Switching VMWare from 32-bit to 64-bit

qec-dpenney
qec-dpenney asked
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I am currently using VM ESXi 4.1.0 on a Dell PowerEdge R710.  It is hosting 3 VMs that are all running Windows Server.  I need to install Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit and in order to do that I have to adjust the BIOS to enable VT so a 64-bit OS can run.

My question is will this change in the BIOS affect the current 32-bit systems running on this server?  I need to know if I have to move these Windows Server 2003 to another VM ESXi or if the change will not affect these VMs.

Thanks in advance for your help.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert PRO / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
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Commented:
You are not the only VMware Admin which has forgotten to do this, on a prduction system, many of us have done it. It's just a real pain to have to shutdown, enable and restart, and then you will be able to use 64 bit VMs.

If you have another server, vMotion, HA or DRS the VMs to another ESX host.
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert PRO / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
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Commented:
for your Dell R710

Go to BIOS (F2), Processor Settings, Enable Virtualization Technology.

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/per710/en/HOM/HTML/syssetup.htm#wp1181886

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Commented:
Thanks for the quick reply.  The current 2003 VMs are live, but I can quickly reboot after hours in order to enable VT.  It is just nice to know that I don't have to spend time moving VMs around.
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert PRO / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
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If you can quickly do it with no-one noticing, I would always recommend, scheduling downtime, and arranging with Service Delivery Manager, and registering a Change Request!

(although very little risk).

I would always move VMs off, a server, I was completing maintenace on.

Author

Commented:
Good point, perhaps a backup is a good idea just in case.  Thanks for your help.
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