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Access 2010

CaptainGiblets
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
I have upgraded from Access 2003 to 2010 and there is something that is really annoying me.

In access 2003, if i was in view mode, i could right click list boxes, buttons and other items and edit their properties, such as click events. In 2010 it will only let me do this in designer mode, its greyed out in view mode.

is there a way to stop this behaviour? As it wastes a lot of time switching between the 2 modes.
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way to go Microsoft....

back to 2003 i go!
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS Liason
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I personally find it incredibly convenient to right click an object bring up the properties, and open the code for an event.
I then can mess with the event's code, and test it right then and there.
Debugging/logic testing has to be done some time :)
Right off the nose works for me
If I like the change, I save.
If not, I close the object without saving.

I HATE that the property window won't open on a right-click in form view.
With the code window open, compiling is just debug|compile.
I do that before closing the code window as a matter of course.

I have a 'decompile' folder where I have shortcuts preloaded with the right command line to decompile any of my production db's
Drag them in, and double click.
Drag them back out to the 'dev' folder after.

I do not find 2007/2010 to be productive environments to modify existing db's
New db's--yes.  New forms and reports, yes
Mind you, EVERY single new form I create in 2007/2010 that I then try to tweak in 2003, I wind up in short order copying every object and scrap of code off, and pasting onto a new form/report.
'There is not enough memory to perform the request operation'

But, that's me.
YMMV
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Yes,

Good posts all.

It just goes to show what some people like, and some don't.
;-)

I'm all for MS "Moving Forward" on MS Access.

It's just that it seems they make new features the default (Like Report View, and Tabbed Documents view)
Without giving you and option to turn these things off "Globally" (For all new databases)


JeffCoacxhman
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Indeed,

I was part of a pre-beta MS focus group for Access 2010.
We wanted the ability to turn the Ribbon off, the ability to lose the Nav Pain, and get the database window back, the abiltity to turn on the menu bar.
Needless to say, you know how that turned out.

They were very big on their SharePoint integration.
When it was discovered that the top end limit for lists was ~50000 records, there wasn't much enthusiasm.
When it was discovered that you couldn't have any VBA code, only macros, there was no enthusiasm.

Sigh.
Maybe someday MS will put out a version that has all the things professional developers would like.
Like an option to make hungarian notation the default naming scheme for unbound controls
or an option to let you DEFINE your own naming scheme
An option to disallow non-SQL Server compliant names and data types.
Anything else?

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Commented:
as for 'There is not enough memory to perform the request operation' i reguarly get this in 2010 as well.. It causes me quite a lot of problems, i will make changes and go to save it and boom... up it pops, i have to close my DB without saving, open it again, repair / compress tool and then try again... Happens around once a day.

I never had this problem with Access 2003.
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Where I get that error WITHOUT fail is if I use a 2007/2010 wizard to create an object and then hand-code changes in 2003.
It never takes long to go BANG!

I'll get it occasionally in 2003 when I alter a really complex form.
But not that often.
It'll go bang as I get closer to the 'self-numbering' of controls toward 255.
ie drag a new control on and it becomes say Command250, yikes!
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Nick, using the wizards, how many objects (approx) until you get this error?

<Command250, yikes!>
Yikes indeed...
LOL

Jeff
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In Access 2003, at any rate, the upper limit is 255.
And it isn't using the wizards per se.

As an experiment, create a bound form with around 20 fields or so.
Copy-paste and delete them 4 times.
Drag a new command button to the form
...20 fields, 20 labels, times 5...
The new command button will come out something like Command200.

I get some complex objects on the go.
I've got a report with seven subreports, 27 hidden controls, and 25 visible controls.

255 isn't that big.
I don't think I ever actually hit it...
But
 'There is not enough memory to perform the request operation'
Means I have to export in the object from a backup, create a new object, copy-and-paste everything, set the resordcsource and background and THEN do the changes I was attempting.  Usually, its a more complex object(combobox or subform/report that tips it over the edge, but not always.

But a wizard-created 2007/2010 form has never yet gone into production with changes made in 2003 without undergoing that noted procedure :(
They are big time savers, and look fairly sharp, but they just go south.
Maybe after actually SAYING this out loud I'll rememebr just to do it first, as soon as I go to touch them in 2003, instead of after they go BANG!  :)
Jeffrey CoachmanMIS Liason
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Commented:
thanks for the info

Jeff
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
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Commented:

 One other thing to keep in mind when creating/deleting large amounts of control; a form over it's life can only have 754 controls created.  Once you hit that limit, you need to start with a new form.

 Note that it's not that it can only hold 754 controls, it's that you can only create 754 controls.  Then your dead in the water.

JimD.
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