• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 795
  • Last Modified:

Replacing Cisco 3750 with Procurve 2900

I have a core switch Cisco 3750, with two connections to a Cisco PIX Firewall
and a VPN router which then connects to 2 external VPN Router installed sites.

I want to replace the Cisco, so I recently Installed a new procurve 2900 core switch, which I
could connect to the internet and into our DMZ both of which go through the firewall so I’ve got those
routes right but I couldn’t ping the BT VPN routers at both of the other sites?

Is it because, currently, one of the ports on the Cisco 3750 core has an IP address
assigned to it which is the IP address of the BT VPN router but the Procurve switch doesn't
have an IP address?
 
Also I was unable to assign an IP address to the DEFAULT_VLAN.
The Cisco 3750 doesn’t have an IP address on VLAN 1 but, as far as I can gather, you have
to assign one to DEFAULT_VLAN on the Procurve switch if you want the web browser to work.
 
I tried to configure an IP address on VLAN 5 to be the same as the Cisco 3750
it kept saying inconsistent value and the only way to get around it was to give it a
subnet of 255.255.255.252 instead of 255.255.255.0.
0
TheNumberUK
Asked:
TheNumberUK
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • +1
4 Solutions
 
Craig BeckCommented:
You don't specifically need to configure an IP address on DEFAULT_VLAN in order to use the GUI.  Many networks don't use VLAN1 (as a security measure) so a different VLAN ID is assigned for management of network devices.

You should be able to put any IP address on any of the VLANs on the Procurve.  What is the IP address you're trying to put on it?

The Procurve switch needs to have the same VLAN IDs and IP addresses as the 3750 if you want things to work without changing gateways, etc.
0
 
TheNumberUKAuthor Commented:
I have sorted the IP address allocation on the vlan thanks, removed it from DEFAULT_VLAN

Another issue I am having is that on the cisco 3750, I had an ip address of 192.168.5.2 255.255.255.252 connected to our external VPN site, how do I configure this same setup on an interface on the Procurve 2910?  so i can ping these remote sites? as far as I know, IP addresses can only be assigned to vlans and not specific ports?  Would I have to enter a route?
0
 
TheNumberUKAuthor Commented:
Just to clarify:
 
Cisco 3750

Vlan5 - 192.168.10.101 /24 (routed)
Vlan10 - 192.168.11.101 /24 (routed)
Vlan15 - 192.168.12.101 /24 (routed)

Fa1/0/23 - 192.168.5.2 /22 (routed)
0
Free learning courses: Active Directory Deep Dive

Get a firm grasp on your IT environment when you learn Active Directory best practices with Veeam! Watch all, or choose any amount, of this three-part webinar series to improve your skills. From the basics to virtualization and backup, we got you covered.

 
Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
I don't believe the Procurve 2900 supports layer 3 interfaces. You'll have to create an additional VLAN, assign an ip address to it and then make the port connected to your VPN a member of that VLAN.
0
 
Craig BeckCommented:
0
 
Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
While it may do static routing, it does not support layer-3 ports.
0
 
TheNumberUKAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys, I'll give that a try :-)
0
 
Craig BeckCommented:
Apologies @ don - I misunderstood!  Not enough coffee ;-)
0
 
Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
Take two espressos and call me in the morning. ;-)
0
 
yawbeCommented:
You have to configure "ip routing" on the procure switch. The Cisco 3750 is a layer 3 switch so it routes by default, but you have to tell the procure switch to route before it will route.
0
 
yawbeCommented:
After looking at the procure 2600 into much detail, what you will have to do is to create a new vlan and assign IP address to the vlan. Configure "ip routing" globally on the switch to turn it to layer 3 switch.

0
 
TheNumberUKAuthor Commented:
Many thanks
0

Featured Post

 The Evil-ution of Network Security Threats

What are the hacks that forever changed the security industry? To answer that question, we created an exciting new eBook that takes you on a trip through hacking history. It explores the top hacks from the 80s to 2010s, why they mattered, and how the security industry responded.

  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • +1
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now