bash shell filtering of number

I am capturing ping statistics to a file, and I am trying to sort data by the max ping time to see if its higher than 10 to save that data to another folder, but I am at a loss, here is a sample of my nasty code ;)
# my ping script:
#!/bin/bash
TIMESTAMP="$(date +%Y%m%d%k%M)"
ping -i 2 -s 8000 -c 300 192.168.1.1 > "/var/spool/pingstats/$TIMESTAMP"

#sample of ping data I want to filter (2.332 is the important number):
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 2.120/2.178/2.332/0.067 ms

# My sort script:
#!/bin/bash
for i in $(grep 'max' /var/spool/pingstats/* |awk ' { print $5}' |cut -d"/" -f3);do
if [ $i -gt 10 ]; then
mv $i /tmp/badpings/
fi
done

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totalimpactAsked:
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point_pleasantCommented:
this shoould work for you

# my ping script:
#!/bin/bash
TIMESTAMP="$(date +%Y%m%d%k%M)"
ping -i 2 -s 8000 -c 5 172.30.156.169 > "/var/spool/pingstats/$TIMESTAMP"
#ping -i 2 -s 8000 -c 5 172.30.156.169

#sample of ping data I want to filter (2.332 is the important number):
#rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 2.120/2.178/2.332/0.067 ms

# My sort script:
#!/bin/bash
for i in `ls /var/spool/pingstats/*`
do
my_var1=`grep max $i |awk '{ print $4}' |cut -d"/" -f3`
my_var=`echo "$my_var1 10" | awk '{if ($1 > $2 ) print $1;else print $2}'`
if [ $my_var != "10" ]; then
        echo "Moving $i ping value is $my_var1\n"
        my_base=`basename $i`
        mv $i /tmp/badpings/$my_base
else
        echo "No Files to move"
fi
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DLehCommented:
cat "/var/spool/pingstats/$TIMESTAMP"|cut -d\/ -f 6

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totalimpactAuthor Commented:
I already have that portion working, I guess I am mostly having trouble with the for loop that compares the output of my grep to see if it is -gt 10.

My ping command logs to a single file for 10 minutes, then after 10 minutes it starts a new file, I can manually grep out the data  that I want - and it makes a line for each ping file, but i need to loop all that through the -gt comparison to see if the data is above 10 - this part is where i am stuck.
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point_pleasantCommented:
i think you also want to print $4 on your awk statement and bash is not real good with decmil arithmitic
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DLehCommented:
This following line doesn't look right:

for i in $(grep 'max' /var/spool/pingstats/* |awk ' { print $5}' |cut -d"/" -f3);do
if [ $i -gt 10 ]; then
mv $i /tmp/badpings/

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Do you want $i to be the line, or the timestamp name of the file.  It looks like you are trying to do both.

As written, $i should be the result output.  So for the last line, you want to do something like:

echo $i >> /tmp/badpings/somefilename

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Since $i is not a file, but a result, you can't really "move" it.
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DLehCommented:
Also, $i (if your awk is correct), will only give you a result, not the full line. So your "somefilename" will look like this:

10.234
11.872
55.982
...

And I'm not sure that's what you want.  Let me look, and I'll see if I can come up with a basic script.
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DLehCommented:
ping -i 2 -s 8000 -c 300 192.168.1.1 |grep time=[1-9][0-9]

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Results:
8008 bytes from 192.168.1.1: icmp_req=1 ttl=63 time=13.4 ms
8008 bytes from 192.168.1.1: icmp_req=2 ttl=63 time=11.4 ms

Now, all you have to do is echo that to a file via >> which you can then name by timestamp.  This will give you all times greater than or equal to 10 ms
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point_pleasantCommented:
sorry use your local IP addr
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totalimpactAuthor Commented:
thats what i was looking for ;)
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