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Moving file permissions from windows 2000 file server to Windows 2003

Posted on 2011-04-28
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Here is my scenario, I currently have a windows 2000 Server which represents our file server.
We also have an Active Directory Windows 2003 Server.
Instead of upgrading our current Windows 2000 Server to 2003 we want to create a new file server with Windows Server2003 on it and move the files from one Server to the next.
I want to make sure that when I  move the folders they will keep their permissions and any other AD functions associated with them.  All users xp computers have associated map drives to the file server also which i would like to keep in tact.
 I have read about ROboCopy but was wondering if there was a better or easier solution.
Will be making the move tomorrow night so would appreciate your help.
Thanks in Advance
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Question by:kcassone
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Expert Comment

by:jbizzle979
ID: 35486013
Are these physical servers or VMWare systems?
Do you use DFS in your current environment? If not, then this might be a good solution for you.

DFS will allow you to share the file shares you currently have mapped to a specific Namespace that will allow you to move the data around, but keep the same name for the mapping.
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Author Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35486090
Currently they are Physical Servers but will be converting to VMWare systems.   How do I know if I  am
using DFS on my SErver
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Author Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35486117
Currently they are physical Servers but will be moving both Servers to VM.  HOw do i know if I am
using DFS?
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by:jbizzle979
ID: 35486164
If it is a file server, you should be able to go to Administrative Tools and see DFSR Management. Do you see that?

Also, I might be mistaken but I believe that DFS may not have been introduced until Server 2003, so you may not have it on Server 2000.
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Author Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35486185
I will take a look now.   THanks
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Author Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35486269
I found it on the 2000 Server but it is not configured

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Expert Comment

by:jbizzle979
ID: 35486352
Ok, well you could use this to maintain the data, but how are you currently mapping the drives on users' systems?

Are you mapping directly to the shares on the server?

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Author Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35486493
Just mapping through my computer and typing in Server address and then the Folder name ie:
\\192.168.0.3\Project Management - if the user has the rights to the folder it will map with there user name and password.
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Expert Comment

by:jbizzle979
ID: 35486602
Ok, so right now, you could create a Namespace namee Project Management and then add the folder target for your server share. Then change the mapped drives to go to the namespace share instead of the current server share.

Basically, when you create the namespace you will go from \\192.168.0.3\Project Management to \\(your domain name)\Project Management.

The benefit of this is that if you change the location of the file share on the server, which you are doing, then you only need to change the folder target in DFS and the mapped drives still use the namespace share which will never change.

This can help you for future upgrades to Server 2008 and beyond as well.
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Author Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35486636
So  can i do this if the Server is still on produfction?   HOw will it affect the users XP computers
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by:jbizzle979
ID: 35486708
Yes, you can do this while the server is in production. It will not affect any of the existing shares, but the way people access them will be changed slightly.

If you change the paths for the mapped drives, then to the user, nothing will have changed, but for you it will give extra leverage to change the locations and the servers that host the data, because DFS will always present the data in the same way no matter where you move the files to as long as you change the folder targets.
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Author Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35486773
So, I currently have 11  folders that are mapped based upon users rights and permissions on the WIndows 2000 Server. Are you saying I should create a Namespace namee for all folders on the WIndows 200o Server?
Then what happens, I have my new Windows 2003 Server created. How do I move the folders?
Sorry for such detail!
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Expert Comment

by:jbizzle979
ID: 35486893
No problem. If the folders you are talking about have something that relates them I would create a Namespace that groups them.

Example: In your environment, you may have 5 folders that deal with specific applications and the other 6 deal with sales.

You could create a namespace called Applications for the first 5 and then add folder targets for the 5 existing folder shares.

Then you would do the same for the other 6, but name the Namespace Sales instead and place the folder targets for the 6 existing shares under the Sales Namespace.

So if two of the folders were called application1 and application2, they would have been accessed before by \\192.168.0.3\application1 and \\192.168.0.3\application2. With the new Namespace, they will be accessed as \\(your domain name)\Applications\application1 and \\(your domain name)\Applications\application2.

Then when you move the shares to the new folder, you can change the folder target to point to the new share but the way they are accessed will not change, which will allow you to keep the mapped drives the same.
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Author Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35487134
Does this mean I need to keep the current Windows 2000 Server running in Production?
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by:jbizzle979
ID: 35487241
No, use the existing shares on the server 2000 to get the Namespace created and create the initial folder targets. Once that is in place, you can change the mapped drives to the Namspace share. Then move the shares to the new 2003 server and change the folder targets under the Namespace to the new locations.

After that is succesful, then you can shut down the 2000 server.
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Author Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35487779
I'm gonna try this tomorrow and see how it goes.  Thanks for your input and I will let you know how it goes!
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Accepted Solution

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kcassone earned 0 total points
ID: 35749552
I decided to just virtualize the windows 2000 server than did an update to 2003.
Not sure what to do with the points
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Author Closing Comment

by:kcassone
ID: 35910025
The other suggestions were too time consuming and had more risks.
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