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Fixed Paging File

1. How do I calculate the paging file?

2. How do i have a fixed paging file?

3. How do I move my paging file to a different drive or partition?

I am told that for performance, its better to have the paging file on a different drive or partition on the server, rather than having it on the C drive where the OS resides. Is this correct?
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ben1211
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ben1211
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4 Solutions
 
ben1211Author Commented:
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XLITSCommented:
The standard response to how big should your paging file is that it should total 1.5x total installed memory.  To set a fixed paging file click on the drive letter in the drive window and set the size of the file you want and then click "set".  To move the paging file, simply click on the drive you want it on and set the size and click "set".  

When you move the paging file you will be required to restart the server.  
   
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XLITSCommented:
Here is a good article on optimizing your page file:

http://www.petri.co.il/pagefile_optimization.htm

It suggests keeping a small page file on your system drive and keeping the main page file on a non-system drive.
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LMiller7Commented:
My standard recommendation:
Unless you have a very specific need, and you understand what you are doing, you should leave the pagefile on default settings.

There are no real benefits with a fixed pagefile on a modern OS. The drawback of a fixed pagefile, unless you make it much larger than is required for normal usage, is that it will be too small for exceptional situations.

Moving the pagefile off the system drive is beneficial only if it is moved to a separate physical drive, NOT a separate partition. A pagefile on a separate partition will impair performance.

Pagefile optimization will only make a real difference if it is currently a performance bottleneck. It usually isn't. On most cases attempts to optimize the pagefile are wasted effort.
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cerrmjCommented:
Most systems ship with a fixed paging file based on the amount of RAM that was initially installed.  If you add more RAM at some later point, then the paging file becomes too small based on the 1.5x criteria (as noted above).

For XP - I always switch the paging file to system managed and just leave it on the boot drive.  Vista and Windows 7 default to a system managed page file.

I've tried moving the page file to another (non OS) drive and did not see any impact.  Manual page file tweaking was beneficial in Win 95/98/ME but not really an issue on XP/Vista/7.

Also, if your drive is fragmented one thing that can help is to defrag your page file.  A normal disk defrag doesn't do this.  There is a nice tool for XP for defragging your page file:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897426.aspx

Good luck,
Bob.
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ben1211Author Commented:
Hi Bob, I am requesting this for Windows 2003 Server. Can I use the same tools for the defrag that you mentioned for XP on a WIN 2K3?
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cerrmjCommented:
Yes, it says it is compatible with Windows 2003 Server - 32bit only.

Bob.
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ben1211Author Commented:
guys, so what is the exact calculation for a fixed paging file?
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XLITSCommented:
I'd stick with the industry standard of 1.5x installed memory.  
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cerrmjCommented:
Yes.  1.5x
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