Cannot ping laptop from domain controller

I have a laptop that I added to my domain while attached to the LAN.  I then  disconnected from the LAN and connected to my wireless network, which is on a different subnet.  The wireless router is configured to use the same local DNS server as my LAN domain, and I can ping any of my servers from the laptop by using the NetBIOS name.  When I try to ping the laptop from any of my servers using the NetBIOS name, the name is resolved to the correct address but the ping itself is unsuccessful.  ICMP-In requests are open on both ends for the domain.  Any ideas on why this may be happening??
Dustin23IT DirectorAsked:
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gbarrientosCommented:
To use the router as an access point do the following:

Do not use the "internet" port on the routerconnect the router to your switch using one other other port on the router.

Then go into the wireless router configuration and turn off dhcp and give your router an address in the 192.168.1.X network. This way you will still be able to access the router to configure it. Once thats done, save configuration and restart the wireless router. Now all your wireless clients will use your DC dhcp's server (if thats where DHCP is located) and will receive an address in the 192.168.1.X network.
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gbarrientosCommented:
Try disabling the firewall
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larrylarrymusicCommented:
Right off the bat check the following things:

1.) Be sure default gateway is properly configured.
2.) If DHCP is used, be sure the address(s) are being appropriately leased and working, along with default gateway configuration on the scopes.

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Dustin23IT DirectorAuthor Commented:
@ AriMC

Yes this has already been done.
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Dustin23IT DirectorAuthor Commented:
@ gbarrientos

I just tried this, and I still have the same result.  The laptop's NB name is resolved to the correct address during ping, but ping is unsuccessful.
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Dustin23IT DirectorAuthor Commented:
@ larrylarrymusic

1) How can I do this?  On the wireless network the default gateway must be configured to be the host address of the router itself.
2) The addresses appear to be working fine for the network.  Leases set to expire in 24 hours.
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AriMcCommented:
Could you provide the actual IP-addesses, netmasks and default gateway addresses for both the server and the laptop?

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vivigattCommented:
what if you use traceroute instead of ping ?
Can you see some of the ICMP packets ?

Can the laptop ping its router?
Can it ping some node in its own subnet? In another subnet of yours? On the Internet?

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Dustin23IT DirectorAuthor Commented:
@vivigatt

It seems now that the problem is that the server cannot ping the wireless router.  I am going to change a setting and see if it works.
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Dustin23IT DirectorAuthor Commented:
Ok, so I just ran a trace route on my wireless router's LAN address (192.168.1.50) and the address resolved to the NetBIOS name of the laptop on the wireless network (10.200.40.3).  Seems really strange.  Once again, when I start a ping on the laptop (10.200.40.3) from one of my servers using the NB name, it resolves to the correct address but the ping fails.  So it seems the trace can't handle the shift on the wireless router from LAN address (192.168.1.50) to WLAN address (10.200.40.1).  Subnets are /24 (LAN) and /28 (WLAN).  This help anyone?
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gbarrientosCommented:
THats because you are routing.... instead of using the wireless router as a router switch it to access point mode.
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Dustin23IT DirectorAuthor Commented:
@gbarrientos

Ok I will do that then.  I thought there was a way to get the other way to work.
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gbarrientosCommented:
No because the router acts like a firewall and it does NAT. So traffic will flow fine out but coming back in will be blocked.
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vivigattCommented:
gbarrientos is 100% right.
The only way around would be to use you router as a real router, not a NAT, if it can do that. DD-WRT firmware can do this on various devices, but this makes the configuration much more complex and having the wireless lan in the same subnet as the rest of the LAN makes things much easier.
Just don't use the "Internet" port on your wireless "router" (which will then be used as a wireless access point only).
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