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250GB 2.5" SATA Drive only seeing 60GB!!

I have a 250GB 2.5" SATA hard drive that I purchased from new, I installed it into a laptop without knowing that it didn't support more than 60GB max.  This has made the hard drive only use 60GB in total on what ever laptop I try it in now to sort out the problem.

I have checked it within disk management within Windows and it only displays 60GB and doesn't show any more space available to use.

Any ideas how I can get this hard drive back to 250GB in size again?
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scratche
Asked:
scratche
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1 Solution
 
DavidCommented:
Well, first let's see if windows is stealing 190GB, or if the HDD is somehow programmed to present only 60GB.  What is the capacity as reported in the BIOS?  
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nobusCommented:
what laptop model is it?
in some cases, a bios update can fix your problem

also, can you explain what you did :  "This has made the hard drive only use 60GB in total "
it looks like you made an image of the old drive and put that on the new disk
then it is normal you see only 60 GB
if the OS is Windows 7 - use disk management, and right click on the 60 Gb volume -then select Expand Volume

post results
(if you have XP - download Bootit-ng (free for what you need) make the cd, boot from it
do NOT install it on the disk - hit Cancel
select Partition work -  select the 60 GB - choose Resize
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scratcheAuthor Commented:
It's saying that's only only seeing the Primary Hard Drive = 58 GB HDD within the BIOS
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rindiCommented:
I haven't seen laptops with SATA interface that have a Capacity limits of 60GB. There used to be limits for IDE drives of 8GB (very old PC's), or 32GB (for later models), but not of 60GB. SATA is a newer interface which shouldn't be Affected by such limits. Also, many IDE drives have a jumper setting to enforce such limits for compatibility with old PC's. But again, on SATA drives I've never seen this. There would be no reason for that.

Are you sure you really got a 250GB drive and not a 60GB Drive? Maybe it was labeled incorrectly? Can you post it's Manufacturer and Part Number?
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scratcheAuthor Commented:
OK, I am sure it's a 250GB drive, it's written on the drive itself.  It's a WD Scorpio Blue 250GB SATA Drive.
I also throught that SATA supported more than 60GB on all laptops with SATA, but I came across one laptop which does only support max of 60GB, it was a Dell Inspiron 6400.

I hear that there is a way to restore the drive to what it should be, either by low level formatting or by manufactures software ??

Any ideas?
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DavidCommented:
One can programmatically change the # of addressable blocks on the HDD.  I do it in my "day job" as part of working on RAID / disk diagnostics.   If somebody did that, then reformatting won't change it back, as by design, the change will survive all read/write commands & reformatting.  

Unfortunately, I can't/won't release this code due to intellectual property issues.  Also, I doubt that this even happened.

Put the HDD in another computer with a more current BIOS.   You may be able to get around the issue by using a USB bridge/enclosure, because that causes the HDD to speak SCSI protocol which may get around the BIOS limit.
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rindiCommented:
Some BIOS will also show you the drive's model number, just to verify that the label on the drive is correct (sometimes you can get bootlegged drives where the label was changed, you wouldn't see the difference on the outside). If the Laptop's BIOS is too simple to show that, try it in a standard PC, those BIOS will very often show the Drive's model Number and not just it's capacity.

If the drive really is labelled correctly, use the HD manufacturer's diagnostic utility on it, it should be able to change any settings back to default. You'll find these tools on the UBCD, or download them directly from their website:

http://ultimatebootcd.com


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dbruntonCommented:
Before you do anything pull off any data you have.

This tool http://hddguru.com/software/2007.07.20-HDD-Capacity-Restore-Tool/ may restore the capacity.

If not check the disk manufacturer for a zero fill tool.
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nobusCommented:
any comments on my  post  scratche?
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garycaseCommented:
Since the drive shows as 60GB in the BIOS, this is clearly NOT a case where you've simple cloned a partition and the rest of the drive is unallocated (as some have suggested above).

Your issue is almost certainly that you've cloned a disk with a host protected area (HPA).   This used to be common for Dell laptops with Media Direct (they've since abandoned the use of HPA for this);  and was also used by IBM to store the "Access Direct" partition [I believe they've also abandoned this; but am not sure (But the last Thinkpad I looked at didn't use it)].

The problem is that the HPA hides the "end" of the disk (where the VERY-hidden Media Direct, Access Direct, etc., partition resides) ... so it is not "seen" by any disk utilities (since it's not exposed in the MBR).   Consequently, when you clone this disk, the new disk will be exactly the same size as the original disk (in fact, they both "look" a bit smaller than the actual size of the original disk ... since the Media Direct (or whatever) partition is not included.

I'm not aware of any 3rd party disk utilities that will correctly clone a disk that uses the HPA.   It was a "good idea" at the time ... or so it seemed ... but both Dell (with Media Direct) and (I think) IBM have switched to "normal" allocation schemes ... so I suspect they've decided the problems outweighted the advantages.

As for your problem:   the truncated disk issue is well know; and relatively easy to fix.   Your new disk now has a very-well-hidden (and very large) HPA that is not "seen" by any disk utility or OS (and since your BIOS supports HPA, it doesn't show it either).   You can use HDAT2 [http://www.hdat2.com/ ], which will reset a drive with an HPA partition to full capacity (see the first question in the FAQ for details on how to do this).

The HDD Capacity restore tool suggested by dbrunton should also remove an HPA, and appears to have a slightly nicer user interface than HDAT2.
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garycaseCommented:
nobus -- the question clearly states "... I have checked it within disk management within Windows and it only displays 60GB and doesn't show any more space available to use. "   ==> this is NOT a simple case of a partition cloned at its original size with unallocated space after it.
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rindiCommented:
hdat2 is included on the UBCD I mentioned earlier, and another tool which should also be able to fix this, mhdd32.
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nobusCommented:
Gary - that is why i asked what he did...
the rest are the "normal" procedures
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garycaseCommented:
Your question was already answered in the author's question => so your comments r.e. the partition size are all useless for this issue.

i.e. NONE of this applies:    "... it looks like you made an image of the old drive and put that on the new disk then it is normal you see only 60 GB   ...     if the OS is Windows 7 - use disk management, and right click on the 60 Gb volume -then select Expand Volume   ... if you have XP - download Bootit-ng ..."

Also, FYI, Boot-It NG has been superseded and is no longer available except via a direct link to the old download (which you should post if you reference it).    The newer Boot-It BM does effectively the same things except it does not have any built-in imaging functions.
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nobusCommented:
thank - oh master, for the nice words
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noxchoCommented:
definitely HPA problem. Just erase the HDD with the tool suggested by gary.
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scratcheAuthor Commented:
Sorry for delay, had to travel for work.

I have run the HDD Capacity program but it doesn't allow me to do anything as per attached screenshot.  Also I include a screenshot of Computer Management show that it only see's 54.48GB in size, when should be 250GB.
ScreenShot001.bmp
ScreenShot002.bmp
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noxchoCommented:
When you click on hyperlink HDS722525VLAT80 does it give any further choices?
The idea of returning the capacity is completely filling the drive with zeroes. What is the vendor of the drive?
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scratcheAuthor Commented:
yes it does, but that's not the drive I want to zero out.  The top drive is my master c drive which works fine.
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rindiCommented:
Did you try using the tools from the UBCD? They are DOS based tools and look different from your screenshot (both HDAT2 and MHDD32, in MHDD32 it is the option "NHPA", Uncut - Return to factory size), both tools are in the "HDD", "Diagnosis" sections.
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garycaseCommented:
As I noted earlier, just read the 1st question in the FAQ here for details on how to restore the size:   http://www.hdat2.com/
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