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Can I set up WiFi just for Internet?

Posted on 2011-05-05
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    I was reading this online poll where it asked people whether they run an open WiFi network. One respondent replied he does, but "my wifi is on a separate subnet, and only has access to the internet, not any of the machines in the house."
     Is it possible to do that? If so, how exactly (does it require anything more than just going into the wireless router settings)?
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Question by:john8217
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Chris Millard earned 500 total points
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What you could do is this (for example). Have your router set up with the following:-

IP 192.168.0.254
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0

Set up DHCP to hand out IPs in the range 192.168.0.128 - 192.168.0.200 with a Subnet mask of 255.255.128.0 and a default gateway of 192.168.0.254

Your home PCs could be on and IP from 192.168.0.1 - 192.168.0.127 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 and a gateway of 192.168.0.254

Alternatively, if your router is sophisticated enough, yuo could look at VLANs
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by:ComputerAidNZ
ComputerAidNZ earned 500 total points
ID: 35698891
Most of the time it is the router that has these features.  VLANs are one way, but some routers have the ability to treat each wireless user as a single standalone entity - it can see nothing other that going out through the internet, which is what you're probably describing, it's a private mode, quite often - Cisco wireless access points have this feature, such as 1250 series, but I doubt you have a Cisco router.  There are other ways to achieve this too, such as creating multiple SSIDs, each user logs into a wireless router with their own SSID and therfore can see no-one else.  Another way is to have different subnets, but this is somewhat more tricky since it all has to be configured corectly, if not some can "see" other PC's on the network, whereas others cannot "see" them!  All depends (often) on the router you have.  The user you are describing seems to have a wired network and a wireless network: the wireless cannot "see" the wired network and vice-versa, since they are on seperate subnets, which is probably done via the routers ability to allow separate subnets (not all routers have this feature).
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by:john8217
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Thanks
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