Drive to drive data migration, shares and permissions

I ran out of space on a DAS device and need to migrate the data to much larger iSCSI based drive on the same server. There are multiple shares and levels of permissions. I'd like to retain both permissions and shares and ideally swap the drive letters so that if hidden shares are mapped they will stay that way.

What's the best process? Do I use robocopy, xcopy? DFS won't work because this is all on the same machine.
adneprovAsked:
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kevinhsiehCommented:
The easy thing to do is just use robocopy to copy everything over to the new drive. Once that is done, change drive letters so the new bigger drive has the old drive letter, and then reboot. The share information is stored in the registry, and the NTFS permissions can be carried over by robocopy if you do it right. You can run robocopy as many times as you need to to get the drives syncronized.

robocopy [source] [destination] /MIR /SEC /R:1 /W:1
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serchlopCommented:
Ok, what I can recommend is to create the second iSCSI drive, disconect the server from the network, use a imaging tool like DriveImage XML in http://www.runtime.org/driveimage-xml.htm. It is free but have some limitations. Then restore the image to the destination disk.

Or use a clone utility to clone the disk.

This two methods should preserve files/folders permissions.

Once you have the disk cloned, you have to start in safe mode and change the disk letters in Disk Management.

Shared information is stored in registry. Like you don't need to change OS partition. Onle iSCSI letters, this should work.
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serchlopCommented:
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adneprovAuthor Commented:
I don't think this will work because I wouldn't be able to restore to the disk if the server is disconnected from the network.
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serchlopCommented:
You can disconnect your server from users network, not necessary from iSCSI network, I don't know your configuration, but the idea is to avoid users access the shared resources, you can stop the server service in services.msc to avoid users connection to the server and then clone the disk.
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Svet PaperovIT ManagerCommented:
If you are willing to keep both iSCSI devices connected to the server, there is another approach too. You can attach the second iSCSI device and extend the existing volume to the newly attached disk using Windows Disk Management. The drawback of this is that if one of both iSCSI devices goes offline you will lose access to the whole volume.  
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wantabe2Commented:
I've done the exact thing & this is what I did for FREE...Download the 30 day eval of Vice Versa

http://www.tgrmn.com/

You will be able to sync the data from one drive to another & it will copy all teh security settings & permissions. As of this date, there is nothing I know of that will copy the share permissions. This should work great for you though.
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wantabe2Commented:
ViceVersa is also cheap! I ended up buying it & now I have it syncing the it every hour. You can also throttle the bandwidth.
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adneprovAuthor Commented:
Worked like a charm. Thank you!
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