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Is there a vSphere CLI command that lists all the snapshots on a given ESXi VM?

Using vmware-cmd.pl  -l     I list all the vm's on an ESXi server.

Is there a command to list all the snapshots (and hopefully all their notes) on each of the vm's?

Thanks.
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gateguard
Asked:
gateguard
1 Solution
 
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
I would recommend using the following tools, also VMware recommends the use of PowerCLI, which is PowerShell interface with vSphere-specific additions.

http://communities.vmware.com/community/vmtn/server/vsphere/automationtools/powercli

One of the simplest PowerCLI examples, and something which is actually extremely useful on its own, is the Get-VM cmdlet. Which lists VMs.

PowerCLI can be a bit overwhelming to use,  But it can be enhanced with a nice toolset and a library of preconfigured scripts to jump-start your mass changes, which is possible with PowerGUI

http://powergui.org/index.jspa

and

VMware Community Pack

http://www.virtu-al.net/featured-scripts/vmware-powerpack/

It's also worth looking at The free VMware Guest Console

http://labs.vmware.com/flings/vgc

The free VMware Guest Console, an experimental application created by VMware Labs, is a great tool for managing vSphere VM processes and files. You can view, sort and kill processes across all VMs, and you can also run a script on all Windows or Linux VMs.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Availailble in the VMware Community Pack

 Snapshots in VMware Community Pack
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coolsport00Commented:
There is a PowerCLI script:
Get-VM | Get-Snapshot | Select VM, Name, Description, Created

Regards,
~coolsport00
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bgoeringCommented:
Yes powercli is likely the best bet. For example:

[vSphere PowerCLI] C:\Program Files (x86)\VMware\Infrastructure\vSphere PowerCLI
> get-vm vshieldmgr | get-snapshot | fl *


Description       : two
Created           : 5/6/2011 8:22:40 PM
Quiesced          : False
PowerState        : PoweredOn
VM                : vShieldMgr
VMId              : VirtualMachine-vm-1643
Parent            :
ParentSnapshotId  :
Children          :
SizeMB            : 11269.11
IsCurrent         : True
IsReplaySupported : False
Id                : VirtualMachineSnapshot-snapshot-1808
Name              : one



[vSphere PowerCLI] C:\Program Files (x86)\VMware\Infrastructure\vSphere PowerCLI
>

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bgoeringCommented:
otherwise you would have to use the vifl.pl from the last question and look for filenames that indicate it is a snapshot
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
or use the VMware Community Pack for everthing. (if you prefer GUIs)
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gateguardAuthor Commented:
Thanks.
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