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How do I redirect dns entries to specific port numbers?

Posted on 2011-05-06
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
I have an application that runs on port 9675. The same Windows Server has other apps running on port 80. I have a DNS record that points the host lms.xxx.local to the address 192.168.10.90. That is the port 80 app.

I would like users to be able to go to help.xxx.local on the same machine without specifying a different port number (9675). Is this possible? If so, where do I make the changes - Windows DNS?
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Question by:Shannon Mollenhauer
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Expert Comment

by:Matt V
ID: 35709413
This is not a function of DNS, but of a proxy server.  You need a reverse proxy server or a router that allows static NAT mappings to do this.
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Author Comment

by:Shannon Mollenhauer
ID: 35709518
I have a Cisco ASA5505 on my WAN edge that does NAT mappings on the outside coming in. Could I use that internally as well?

So I would set up a NAT rule that says help.xxx.local points to 192.168.10.90:9675?
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Chris Dent earned 750 total points
ID: 35709644
> Could I use that internally as well?

No, the traffic never gets to your firewall if it's internal. It has to cross the firewall for NAT to be available.

I'm going to assume web-application, it's the most common reason for this kind of request. So, depending on the nature of the application, a few options spring to mind:

1. Web-server redirection (answer on http://help.xxx.local on port 80, then redirect to 9675)
2. Establish a second IP on the server and use Port 80
3. Depending on the other stuff, use Host Headers and the original server IP

Chris
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Expert Comment

by:techfortat
ID: 35709648
You can do this simply using DNS and IIS. I am not familiar with the exact setup you have but I have administered many Web servers hosting different websites. Same basic principle. Although I will give you the basics of what you need to do and if you need more detailed information let me know and I can get specifics.

You create A records in your DNS to point to your web server. Here are three different record examples to help ease your understanding of IIS.

WWW pointing to 192.168.10.90
 (using as an example but imagine this is your external website)
Intranet pointing to 192.168.10.90
 (using as an example but imagine this is your internal website for application installs)
LMS pointing to 192.168.10.90
 (the new application site you want to setup)

So now that the DNS pointer are setup your question is more reliant on IIS. You need to name your IIS sites and set the port they are listening on.
So when you make the name for your website it will be
WWW or www.yourdomain.com or just the default IIS first site listening on port 80

next one would have to be a manual setup
Intranet or intranet.yourdomain.com : listening on port 80

The app server
LMS or LMS.yourdomain.com : listening on port 80

You can also define extra names within IIS. So say you also wants LMS to handle requests for LastManStanding.yourdomain.com then you can add that too and you set one as a primary but it will answer for all.

Now routing it from the internet into your network is just as easy. You setup records in your DNS hosting company to point the public domains to that that IP address with the prefix LMS.yourdomain.com. Then when the request is forwarded to the IP address of your web server it sends it through the port 80 hole in your firewall and the DNS server forwards the request to IIS where it determines which site you want based on the Site name, or header. If you need more info on how to do that let me know but it sounds like you need internal sites for applications.

What version of IIS are you running and what version of server? Then I can give you more detailed information on how to set this up/ add it to your existing IIS site setup.
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Author Comment

by:Shannon Mollenhauer
ID: 35709812
I think you're getting into the right details, techfortat. Here's more info that might help:

The server is not running IIS. It is running Moodle (the LMS package) and Spiceworks (the helpdesk package).
Moodle listens on port 80 already. It runs as a Windows service.
Spiceworks runs on 9675, but I'm not sure how to get traffic labeled for HELP.xxx.com (or HELP.xxx.local to redirect to that port based on the site name. Maybe I need to have IIS loaded on this machine specifically for redirecting the site to the appropriate port?
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Expert Comment

by:techfortat
ID: 35709874
Yes and I am willing to bet it is setting it up behind the scenes. Check to see if IIS was installed and configured by going my favorite route. Right-Click on My computer and select manage. Expand services and Applications and if you see IIS, Internet Information Service listed at all then it is installed and running, expand that to see what sites you have listed.
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Author Comment

by:Shannon Mollenhauer
ID: 35709893
Already thought of that - no IIS services running anywhere in the list. I think Moodle may be running Apache (it is often deployed on Linux boxes) and there is an Apache service running. Maybe I should figure out how to create a site for HELP on the Apache server and redirect like I would in IIS....?
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Expert Comment

by:Chris Dent
ID: 35709896
Spiceworks uses its own web service, it'd be way too simple for us if it used IIS :)

You could redirect via IIS though, of course if something else is sitting on 80 you'd need another IP on the server (assuming other services aren't greedy).

Chris
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Expert Comment

by:techfortat
ID: 35709936
That sounds like a plan too. There are a few routes you can take. Chris-Dent is right you can use IIS to redirect but you will need another IP address to listen to port 80. I haven't even messed with an IIS server in like 6-7 years nor do i have one in front of me. My first post was slightly inaccurate in config but the concept is the same. You setup the site name, port and internal IP you are listening on.

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Expert Comment

by:techfortat
ID: 35709962
here is a link to a link to a Microsoft article on how to host multiple websites using IIS 6. It is short and sweet and i think you will find it easier to setup and get operational.

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/b77cf015-017f-489c-9b5b-65ca4a679392.mspx?mfr=true
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Expert Comment

by:techfortat
ID: 35709998
Oh then once you setup an IIS instance for production or just as a phantom to forward here are the forwarding directions:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/6b855a7a-0884-4508-ba95-079f38c77017.mspx?mfr=true
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Author Comment

by:Shannon Mollenhauer
ID: 35750029
Looks like the IIS option might be the easiest for me to implement (I hope). I'll try this and award points as soon as testing is done.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Shannon Mollenhauer
ID: 35790844
I actually realized from this suggestion about the second IP address that I'm running on VMware so I can easily add a second virtual NIC and assign a separate IP to it. Thanks for triggering the DUH factor in my own thoughts!
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